Q&A Spotlight

How Would You Insulate My New House?

Posted on March 30, 2015 by Scott Gibson

Nik Fiorito is grappling with the same issues every owner/builder eventually confronts: What's the best way of insulating a new house? Only in Fiorito's case, it gets a little more complicated.

First, he's building in Climate Zone 7, forty minutes north of the U.S.-Canadian border, on a hilltop where the temperature averaged 3 below zero F (-19.6 degrees C.) this past February. He's also considering a fully off-grid photovoltaic(PV) Generation of electricity directly from sunlight. A photovoltaic cell has no moving parts; electrons are energized by sunlight and result in current flow. (PVPhotovoltaics. Generation of electricity directly from sunlight. A photovoltaic (PV) cell has no moving parts; electrons are energized by sunlight and result in current flow.) system plus a ground-source heat pumpHome heating and cooling system that relies on the mass of the earth as the heat source and heat sink. Temperatures underground are relatively constant. Using a ground-source heat pump, heat from fluid circulated through an underground loop is transferred to and/or from the home through a heat exchanger. The energy performance of ground-source heat pumps is usually better than that of air-source heat pumps; ground-source heat pumps also perform better over a wider range of above-ground temperatures. for both heat and domestic hot water.

Does a Fireplace Belong in a Green Home?

Posted on March 16, 2015 by Scott Gibson

Clara Kim and her husband are nearly finished planning their new custom home. Only a few details remain before they can seek construction bids. But one of the remaining loose ends has major energy implications.

Can Solar Electricity Trump a Ductless Minisplit?

Posted on March 2, 2015 by Scott Gibson

Ven Sonata's query is simple: If the falling cost of installing a photovoltaic(PV) Generation of electricity directly from sunlight. A photovoltaic cell has no moving parts; electrons are energized by sunlight and result in current flow. (PVPhotovoltaics. Generation of electricity directly from sunlight. A photovoltaic (PV) cell has no moving parts; electrons are energized by sunlight and result in current flow.) system has killed off the viability of solar hot water systems, as GBA senior editor Martin Holladay believes, does it also represent a threat to the beloved ductless minisplit for heating and cooling?

Why Is It So Humid In Here?

Posted on February 16, 2015 by Scott Gibson

From the sound of it, Andy Chappell-Dick has left no stone unturned in his quest to keep the air inside his house comfortably dry.

His extremely tight new house in northern Ohio (Climate Zone 5) is built with structural insulated panels, and heated and cooled with a pair of ductless minisplit heat pumps. For ventilation, Chappell-Dick has a Venmar Kubix heat-recovery ventilator(HRV). Balanced ventilation system in which most of the heat from outgoing exhaust air is transferred to incoming fresh air via an air-to-air heat exchanger; a similar device, an energy-recovery ventilator, also transfers water vapor. HRVs recover 50% to 80% of the heat in exhausted air. In hot climates, the function is reversed so that the cooler inside air reduces the temperature of the incoming hot air. that pulls exhaust air from two small bathrooms and supplies fresh air to two upstairs bedrooms with a flow rate of between 40 and 80 cubic feet per minute (cfm).

Choosing the Right Wall Assembly

Posted on February 2, 2015 by Scott Gibson

Southwest Nebraska sounds like the kind of place that gets all kinds of weather: hot and occasionally humid summers, cold winters, and by many accounts lots of wind. This is where Nicholas C will be building his house, and the question is, how?

He's done so much reading on the subject that he's now confused by the number of options he has. Getting it right is important because Nicholas plans on living in the house for a long time.

His best thinking so far? A 2x8 stud wall framed on 16-inch centers and insulated with blown-in cellulose, then wrapped in 2 inches of rigid foam insulation.

Designing an HVAC System for a Cold Climate

Posted on January 19, 2015 by Scott Gibson

Randy Bunney is building a new house in a challenging environment — north central Minnesota, where overnight temperatures plunge well below zero and heating-degree days over the last three years have averaged more than 8,600 annually.

The high-performance, passive-solar home will be a relatively small 1,100-square feet with two bedrooms, an open living-kitchen-dining area, 1 1/2 baths, a mudroom and a mechanical room. Bunney is planning on exterior walls insulated to R-40, the roof to R-60, and "near airtight" construction.

Choosing a New Wood Stove

Posted on January 5, 2015 by Scott Gibson

Patricia Appelbaum is in the market for a new wood-burning stove, one without a catalytic element, to provide mostly supplemental heat for her 1,600-square-foot home. There are a lot of models to choose from, and that's part of the problem.

How to Heat a Garage

Posted on December 22, 2014 by Scott Gibson

If you're lucky enough to have a garage, you already know it can be used for more than keeping your car out of the snow. As Kent Jeffery explains in a Q&A post at GreenBuildingAdvisor, garages also are useful for car and equipment repairs, and for storing garden vegetables, cans of paint and anything else a spouse may not want in the house.

But in order for a garage to serve those purposes, the temperature has to be above freezing — and for much of the country that means a source of heat.

Second Guessing an Insulation Upgrade

Posted on December 8, 2014 by Scott Gibson

Is there anything worse than getting midway through a renovation and then suddenly wondering whether you've got some important detail all wrong?

That seems to be the predicament of William Lucrisia, who's in the midst of an insulation upgrade at his house north of Seattle.

"The house was heated by propane," he explains in a Q&A post at Green Building Advisor. It was a cost that was hard to get hold of, especially with some of the design [features] of the house (high ceiling)."

Does a Crawl Space Make Sense?

Posted on November 24, 2014 by Scott Gibson

Michael Geoghegan is designing a house for a mixed, humid climate and he plans on using an insulated crawl space.

Register for a free account and join the conversation


Get a free account and join the conversation!
Become a GBA PRO!

Syndicate content