Q&A Spotlight

The Best Way to Insulate a Floor

Posted on June 2, 2014 by Scott Gibson

Jim Wright's house in western Arkansas has a post-and-pier foundation that elevates floor framing about 40 inches off the ground. Unlike a house with a basement, crawl space, or slab foundation, there is no enclosure at the bottom of the house, so the floor is more or less like another exterior wall.

How, Wright wonders, should this be insulated?

Updating an Antique Heating System

Posted on May 19, 2014 by Scott Gibson

The multistory brick home in Frederick, Maryland, is an "amazing property that deserves to be lived in and preserved," says a Green Building Advisor reader who calls himself Joe Schmo. Its Achilles heel is a heating and cooling system that costs thousands of dollars a year to operate.

The system consists of an oil-fired boiler that supplies radiators with steam, two air-source heat pumps that provide air conditioning, and back-up electric resistance heat. There's a 4-ton unit in the basement for the first floor, and a 3-ton unit in an attic that serves the second floor.

Do I Really Need a Concrete Basement Floor?

Posted on May 5, 2014 by Scott Gibson

Rob Rosen is diving into a basement remodel, a job that involves digging out and removing a concrete slab to provide more headroom so the basement can be turned into usable living space.

He'll reinforce the footing and foundation as needed, but when it comes time to build a new floor for the basement, Rosen wonders whether he can go with something other than a concrete slab.

Building a Foolproof Low-Slope Roof

Posted on April 21, 2014 by Scott Gibson

Carolyn Wood is building a house 80 miles north of Vancouver, British Columbia, and if nothing else she'd like to get all the details in the roof assembly right. The question is whether the house is too far along to let her reach that goal.

The roof, with a 2-in-12 pitch, is framed with I-joists, strapped with 2x4s, and sheathed with 1/2-in. plywood. Above the roof sheathingMaterial, usually plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), but sometimes wooden boards, installed on the exterior of wall studs, rafters, or roof trusses; siding or roofing installed on the sheathing—sometimes over strapping to create a rainscreen. , the roofers plan to install NovaSeal roofing underlayment and standing-seam metal roofing.

What’s the Best Basement Flooring System?

Posted on April 7, 2014 by Scott Gibson

With a basement remodel underway, Jeff Dieterle weighs his options for a trouble-free floor. "We want to do the kitchen and bathroom in tile or stone and the rest of the area in wall-to-wall carpet," he writes in a Q&A post at Green Building Advisor.

Fixing a Leaky Log Home

Posted on March 24, 2014 by Scott Gibson

Early settlers who felled their own trees to build log homes were probably so grateful to be out of the weather they didn't worry about air leaks or cold walls. But when your heating bills are $500 a month, it's a different story altogether.

That's the situation facing ADK Homeowner, as he explains in a Q&A post at Green Building Advisor.

HVAC for a ‘Pretty Good House’

Posted on March 10, 2014 by Scott Gibson

Matt Mesa is looking ahead to retirement in a new, one-level house in Hood River, Oregon. It's going to be a Pretty Good House, a phrase coined to describe a well-insulated house of an appropriate size.

Flash and Batt in the Roof

Posted on February 24, 2014 by Scott Gibson

"Flash and batt" is an insulation technique that combines the air-sealing superiority of spray foam insulation with the cost benefits of fiberglass batts. An inch or two of polyurethane foam seals the cavity and the batt insulationInsulation, usually of fiberglass or mineral wool and often faced with paper, typically installed between studs in walls and between joists in ceiling cavities. Correct installation is crucial to performance. adds R-valueMeasure of resistance to heat flow; the higher the R-value, the lower the heat loss. The inverse of U-factor. without costing an arm and a leg.

That's roughly the plan Dave Frank is considering for the roof of a house — presumably his own house — in Climate Zone 5. But his plan contains a twist: He wants to spray the underside of the roof deck with foam and install the batts between the joists at ceiling level.

The Big Allure of Cheap PV

Posted on February 10, 2014 by Scott Gibson

Until now, Patrick McCombe has believed that improvements to the envelope of his home should come before an investment in photovoltaic(PV) Generation of electricity directly from sunlight. A photovoltaic cell has no moving parts; electrons are energized by sunlight and result in current flow. panels. Now he's weighing a deal that seems too good to pass up.

McCombe lives in Connecticut (he's an associate editor at Fine Homebuilding magazine) and he recently attended an informational meeting sponsored by an organization working to lower the cost of PVPhotovoltaics. Generation of electricity directly from sunlight. A photovoltaic (PV) cell has no moving parts; electrons are energized by sunlight and result in current flow.. Panels could be purchased or leased, but the bottom line was that with federal and state incentives, McCombe could buy a 10-kilowatt array for $15,000.

Singing the Ice Dam Blues

Posted on January 27, 2014 by Scott Gibson

Winter is the season of icicles and ice dams, at least on houses whose roofs are poorly insulated and air-sealed.

Or, in the case of a nature center in Wisconsin, not insulated at all. Walt Ott is inquiring about the best way to fix a building with a completely uninsulated cathedral ceiling.

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