Building Science

Ground Gutters

Posted on August 11, 2009 by Michael Maines

The rubble stone foundation walls wept every time it rained, creating a dank, humid basement. The destructive power of ice dams, and a huge, overhanging elm tree created maintenance issues, leaving our clients unwilling to replace the gutters original to the old two-story house. The lot sloping to the rear left the downhill neighbors’ yards saturated much of the year. How were we going to solve these problems? By installing a ground gutter system.

Understanding Indoor Air Quality (1) - Building Science Podcast

Posted on August 3, 2009 by Joe Lstiburek

This podcast series is excerpted from a two-day class called "Building Science Fundamentals" taught by Dr. Joe Lstiburek and Dr. John Straube, of Building Science Corporation.

GBA Radio  - Podcast: Building Science Fundamentals

How Air Affects a House (2) - Building Science Podcast

Posted on July 16, 2009 by John Straube

This podcast series is excerpted from a two-day class called "Building Science Fundamentals" taught by Dr. Joe Lstiburek and Dr. John Straube, of Building Science Corporation.

GBA Radio  - Podcast: Building Science Fundamentals

How Air Affects a House (1) - Building Science Podcast

Posted on June 26, 2009 by John Straube

This podcast series is excerpted from a two-day class called "Building Science Fundamentals" taught by Dr. Joe Lstiburek and Dr. John Straube, of Building Science Corporation.

GBA Radio  - Podcast: Building Science Fundamentals

Insulation Retrofits on Old Masonry Buildings - Building Science Podcast

Posted on June 15, 2009 by Joe Lstiburek

This podcast series is excerpted from a two-day class called "Building Science Fundamentals" taught by Dr. Joe Lstiburek and Dr. John Straube, of Building Science Corporation.

GBA Radio  - Podcast: Building Science Fundamentals

Rain Control in Energy Efficient Buildings - Building Science Podcast

Posted on May 20, 2009 by Joe Lstiburek

This podcast series is excerpted from a two-day class called "Building Science Fundamentals" taught by Dr. Joe Lstiburek and Dr. John Straube, both of Building Science Corporation.

3D

How to Use Climate Consultant 4

Posted on May 8, 2009 by Peter Yost

For over 2,000 locations across the country, there are hourly weather data files packed with temperature, humidity, and wind information that can be used to better match home designs to the conditions they will face. But to say that all this information is dense and overwhelming is a bit of an understatement.

GBA Radio  - Podcast: Building Science Fundamentals

The Perfect Wall, Roof, and Slab — Building Science Podcast

Posted on May 6, 2009 by Joe Lstiburek

This podcast series is excerpted from a two-day class called Building Science Fundamentals with Drs. Joe Lstiburek and John Straube of Building Science Corporation. For information on attending a live class, go to BuildingScienceseminars.com This week Dr. Joe talks about enclosure design principles of energy efficient buildings

Tear at the fastener

Beyond Water Resistance

Posted on April 23, 2009 by Peter Yost

Housewraps and Building PaperTypically referring to Grade D building paper, this product is an asphalt-impregnated kraft paper that looks a lot like a lightweight asphalt felt. The Grade D designation has come to mean that the building paper passes ASTM D779 (minimum 10-minute rating with the “boat test”) and different products are called out as “30-minute” or even “60-minute” based on D779 results. At times confused with roofing felt, roofing felts and building paper differ in two ways: felts are made of recycled-content paper, building papers of virgin paper; felts are made of a heavier stock paper; building papers a lighter stock. See also roofing felt.: Beyond Water Resistance

Tensile strength, vapor permeability, and pliability are important, too.

In a recent blog post, I covered water-resistive barrierSometimes also called the weather-resistive barrier, this layer of any wall assembly is the material interior to the wall cladding that forms a secondary drainage plane for liquid water that makes it past the cladding. This layer can be building paper, housewrap, or even a fluid-applied material. (WRB) tests to separate the wheat from the chaff in terms of water resistance. But a good WRB has other properties as well.

Rotten sill

Don’t Let This Happen to You

Posted on April 12, 2009 by Michael Maines

Door design details
The photo at right is from an entry that's just 15 years old. Fortunately, it was able to be repaired. I haven’t always been so lucky. Let’s just say that replacing subfloor and framing is no fun. A safe assumption is that, for one reason or another, doors always leak. They shouldn’t, but they do. Seals wear out. Wind blows. Jambs rot. Sills crack. Weepholes clog. Following are some ways to mitigate the chance of damage.

    Register for a free account and join the conversation


    Get a free account and join the conversation!
    Become a GBA PRO!

    Syndicate content