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High-Tech Windows with Dynamic Glazings

Posted on Dec 2 2009 by Alex Wilson

Last week I wrote about one of the innovative building materials that I saw at this year’s Greenbuild Conference in Phoenix (phase-change drywall). This week, I’ll cover a very different innovation from the conference: dynamic window glazingWhen referring to windows or doors, the transparent or translucent layer that transmits light. High-performance glazing may include multiple layers of glass or plastic, low-e coatings, and low-conductivity gas fill..

Windows provide some important functions in houses: admitting natural daylight, allowing views to the outdoors, letting in fresh air, and protecting against unwanted heat loss and gain. How effectively they do all this depends mostly on the glazings (usually glass, but sometimes plastic, or a combination of glass and plastic). Energy performance can be significantly improved by adding multiple layers of glazing separated by sealed air spaces, by using special low-emissivityAmount of heat radiation emitted from a particular body or material. Emissivity is expressed in a fraction or ratio, with the lowest values indicating low emissivity and the highest indicating the high emissivity of flat black surfaces. (low-e) coatings on the glazing, by using tinted glass that blocks unwanted solar heat gainIncrease in the amount of heat in a space, including heat transferred from outside (in the form of solar radiation) and heat generated within by people, lights, mechanical systems, and other sources. See heat loss., or by using low-conductivity gas fill, such as argonInert (chemically stable) gas, which, because of its low thermal conductivity, is often used as gas fill between the panes of energy-efficient windows. and kryptonA colorless, odorless inert gas, often used with argon in fluorescent lighting and sometimes used as gas fill in high-performance glazing., that slows the movement of heat through the space between layers of glass.

The problem is that when you choose a particular glazing for windows, you’re locked into very specific window performance properties. Tinted glass, for example, not only blocks solar heat gain, but also reduces visible light transmittance--making it harder to see through the windows. Blocking that solar gain may be fine most of the time, but even in warm climates there can be times, in the winter for example, when you’d like to bring in that extra solar heat.

This lack of flexibility with the usual materials has led some companies to pursue technologies that would allow glazing properties to change, based either on user preferences or on conditions such as temperature. These are collectively referred to as “dynamic glazings.”

There were a number of dynamic glazings being exhibited at Greenbuild. I was already familiar with SageGlass, from Sage Electrochromics. This is an “electrochromic” glazing that is normally clear, but it can be tinted by charging it with a small amount of electric current. When SageGlass is used in an insulated glass unit (with standard clear glass), a user can flip a switch, to tint the glass, dropping the solar transmittance from 62% down to 3.5%. It takes a small amount of electricity, about 0.3 watts per square foot, to switch it from clear to tinted (a process that takes 5-10 minutes), then somewhat less current, 0.1 watts per square foot, to maintain the tinted state. When the current flow is switched off, the glazing reverts to it default (clear) state.

SageGlass is available as an (expensive) option with Velux skylights and about a dozen commercial glazing systems. The high cost of SageGlass can be offset to some extent, particularly in commercial applications, by eliminating the need for widow blinds, but it’s still very expensive—$50-75 per square foot.

The new dynamic glazing product I saw at Greenbuild was from the start-up company RavenBrick. This is a passive, “thermochromic” glazing that changes from clear to tinted when it heats up, such as in bright sunlight. While SageGlass is a metallic coating on the glass, like common low-e coatings, RavenBrick uses an organic material sandwiched between two layers of glass. The actual thermochromic material is only eight microns thick.

Clear in its normal state, when the RavenBrick coating is heated up it darkens to allow only 8% light transmission. The idea is that during a hot sunny day, the glass will heat up and activate the thermochromic material, blocking most of the sunlight, while on a cooler or cloudy day, the glass will remain clear. A big advantage is that it doesn’t take any electricity to activate or maintain the tinting, as is necessary with SageGlass, but the down side is that it isn’t controllable by building occupants.

There may be times when you want sunlight in the building or views to the outdoors even when significant heat gain will occur. Also, there may be some weird results if there’s a shadow on a portion of a window, resulting in only part of the glass being darkened.

The company claims that the product will become available in March 2010, and they are providing prototype glazing for an installation at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. As with SageGlass, RavenBrick will sell product to window manufacturers, rather than producing windows themselves. RavenBrick’s president told me that the cost will be about $25 per square foot—somewhat lower than SageGlass. It could be a great product; I’ll be watching the test installation carefully.

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Image Credits:

  1. SageGlass Electronics, Inc.

2.
Fri, 12/18/2009 - 20:08

LCD glass
by gsla

Helpful? 0

Dec 18, 2009
6:57 PM EST LED glass
by gsla

There is another option ie. LCD glass -UMU switchable glass manufactured by NSG in Japan,
http://www.umupro.com/
it cost about USD124 psf when I first enquired about it in back in 2005. Should be much lower now with SAGE already into large scale production. Back then, SAGE only cater to small orders and cost about the same too.
or
Powerglass by Glas Platz in Germany
http://www.glas-platz.de/powerglass/en/news-id.23.html


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