The most recent blogs at Green Building Advisor

Beefing Up Insulation (and Making it Easier to Hang Cabinets) in a Kitchen Remodel

Posted on October 25, 2010 by Scott Gibson in Q&A Spotlight

Eric Nash is renovating a kitchen with "old school" 2x4 walls. He's gutting the room, but not touching the outside of the house. He'd like to present the homeowners with some options for increasing the R-valueMeasure of resistance to heat flow; the higher the R-value, the lower the heat loss. The inverse of U-factor. of the exterior walls while making a better air seal.

Here's his plan: fill the stud bays with cellulose, add 1 1/2 in. of rigid foam insulation on the inside, then a layer of 1/2-in. plywood on which to hang cabinets, and, finally, 1/2-in. drywall.

Navigating Energy Star’s Thermal Bypass Checklist

Posted on October 22, 2010 by Martin Holladay, GBA Advisor in Musings of an Energy Nerd

If you’ve ever built an Energy StarLabeling system sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Energy for labeling the most energy-efficient products on the market; applies to a wide range of products, from computers and office equipment to refrigerators and air conditioners. home, then you’re familiar with the Thermal Bypass Checklist. Originally adopted on July 1, 2006, the Checklist identifies areas in homes under construction that must be inspected by a certified rater for a house to qualify for an Energy Star label.

Green Building Priority #5 – Build Smaller

Posted on October 20, 2010 by Alex Wilson in Energy Solutions

While the trend has begun to turn around, we've been building larger and larger houses for decades. In 1950, the average house in the U.S. was about 1,100 square feet, while there were about 3.4 people per household, according to data I compiled for a 1999 article in Environmental Building News. The U.S. Census Bureau reports that in 2009 the average new house in the U.S. was 2,438 square feet (down slightly from 2,518 square feet in 2008), while the average household size was 2.6 people.

What Do You Want To Know About Passivhaus?

Posted on October 20, 2010 by GBA Team in Green Building Blog

A few Green Building Advisor staff members and contributors will attend the "Passivhaus, LEED, and the City of Boston" symposium on Saturday, where Passivhaus Institute founder Dr. Wolfgang Feist will be speaking about "The concept, experience, and dissemination of Passivhaus."

Healthy Child Healthy World, Part 2

Posted on October 19, 2010 by Annette Stelmack, GBA Advisor in Building Science

To create healthy and sustainable interiors for our clients, it is essential that we understand how to enhance indoor air quality, tapping into IAQIndoor air quality. Healthfulness of an interior environment; IAQ is affected by such factors as moisture and mold, emissions of volatile organic compounds from paints and finishes, formaldehyde emissions from cabinets, and ventilation effectiveness.-specific resources and expertise. GREENGUARD Environmental Institute (GEI) is at the top of my resource list.

Q&A Spotlight: Will One Radiant Floor Heat Two Stories?

Posted on October 18, 2010 by Scott Gibson in Q&A Spotlight

Michael Schonlau is building a house in Omaha, Nebraska, where he can expect 6,000+ heating degree days a year. He's planning on putting a radiant-floor system in the basement slab of the ranch-style home with a footprint of about 1,600 sq. ft.

In a recent posting on GBA's page, Schonlau asked whether he'll have to install radiant loops under the subfloor of the first floor as well as the basement — or will the heat generated in the basement migrate upstairs and keep the house comfortable?

Carpet in Basements: The Issues, Solutions, and Alternatives

Posted on October 17, 2010 by Peter Yost in Green Communities

Designing dry, warm basement floors

Dry, warm, basement floors are designed to manage:

Bloggers Who Blog About Green Building Advisor

Posted on October 17, 2010 by GBA Team in Green Building Blog

THANKS, BLOGGERS!

We will continue to update and promote this page as we stumble across more bloggers talking about our little site.

Bloggers: Visit our Press Room for RSS feeds of most of our frequently refreshing stuff:


constructionmanagementdegree.org
(GBAGreenBuildingAdvisor.com is included in a list of Green Architecture, Construction and Renovation blogs.)

Musings on Lawsuits, Spiritual Energy, and Metal Roofs

Posted on October 16, 2010 by Carl Seville, GBA Advisor in Green Building Curmudgeon

As most people in the green building world have recently learned, Henry Gifford has filed a class action suit against the USGBC and several executives of the organization. His claims include fraud and monopolistic practices. He claims that the USGBC is attempting to monopolize the building industry at the expense of anyone who doesn’t have a LEEDLeadership in Energy and Environmental Design. LEED for Homes is the residential green building program from the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). While this program is primarily designed for and applicable to new home projects, major gut rehabs can qualify. AP credential. He does have a point that being a LEED AP has no direct correlation to whether or not you know anything about how buildings work or perform.

Calculating the Minimum Thickness of Rigid Foam Sheathing

Posted on October 15, 2010 by Martin Holladay, GBA Advisor in Musings of an Energy Nerd

UPDATED on August 26, 2014 with new information on flash-and-batt requirements in the 2012 IRCInternational Residential Code. The one- and two-family dwelling model building code copyrighted by the International Code Council. The IRC is meant to be a stand-alone code compatible with the three national building codes—the Building Officials and Code Administrators (BOCA) National code, the Southern Building Code Congress International (SBCCI) code and the International Conference of Building Officials (ICBO) code.

If you plan to install exterior rigid foam on the walls of your house, how thick should the foam be? Although the GBAGreenBuildingAdvisor.com Web site has addressed this question several times in our Q&A column and various blogs, the question continues to perplex readers. New questions along these lines come our way regularly.

The last time I answered the question was at the end of a long, very technical blog. In this blog, I'll cut to the chase.

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