The most recent blogs at Green Building Advisor

Revisiting Ventilation

Posted on November 17, 2017 by Martin Holladay in Musings of an Energy Nerd

My comprehensive article on residential ventilation systems, “Designing a Good Ventilation System,” was published back in 2009. A few things have changed in the last eight years, so it’s time to revisit the topic.

Urban Rustic: Ventilation Baffles

Posted on November 16, 2017 by Eric Whetzel in Guest Blogs

Editor's note: This post is one of a series by Eric Whetzel about the design and construction of his house in Palatine, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. The first blog in his series was called An Introduction to a New Passive House Project; a list of Eric's previous posts appears below. For more details, see Eric's blog, Kimchi & Kraut.

The Four Laws of Thermodynamics

Posted on November 15, 2017 by Allison A. Bailes III, PhD in Building Science

Building science is an odd subject. Few colleges and universities teach it. The majority of those who work on buildings call themselves engineers, architects, and contractors, not building scientists. And many of those who do invoke the term can explain at least one implication of the second law of thermodynamics (we'll get to that below) but may not know what the other laws of thermodynamics are, why their numbering is so peculiar, or even how many there are. Do you?

How the Suniva Trade Dispute is Reshaping the Solar Industry

Posted on November 14, 2017 by Anonymous in Guest Blogs

By MAGGIE PARKHURST and JOEL BINSTOCK

Planning a Retrofit in the Pacific Northwest

Posted on November 13, 2017 by Scott Gibson in Q&A Spotlight

Brad Steeg's Seattle home was built in 1915, and from the description he provides in this post at GBA's Q&A forum, it's not hard to understand why Steeg is so uncomfortable during the winter: not much insulation, single-pane windows, and lots of air leaks.

"During the winter, my thermostat reads 70° but it still feel cold because the cold walls and ceiling suck the heat out of my body," Steeg writes.

Kitchen Design

Posted on November 10, 2017 by Martin Holladay in Musings of an Energy Nerd

Every decade, kitchen design becomes more complicated. It’s gotten to the point where some residential designers subcontract the work to a specialist.

If you are a humble owner-builder, do your kitchen preferences even matter anymore? Of course they do. If you’re building a house, you should certainly have a say in matters affecting kitchen design — even if your ideas are different from those of the experts.

Reeling from the California Wildfires

Posted on November 9, 2017 by Anonymous in Guest Blogs

By Clare Trapasso, realtor.com.

How Many Tons of Air Does a 2.5 Ton Air Conditioner Move?

Posted on November 8, 2017 by Allison A. Bailes III, PhD in Building Science

We live in this invisible stuff called air. (But of course you knew that.) We pump it into and out of our lungs. We exhaust it from our bathrooms and kitchens. We cycle it through our heating and air conditioning systems. If we're lucky, we live in a home that even brings outdoor air inside as part of a whole-house ventilation system. But we're missing something.

Transforming the Real Estate Market

Posted on November 7, 2017 by Radhika Lalit in Guest Blogs

The U.S. residential real estate market is booming, with new home sales steadily rising over the last few years. In March 2017, over 621,000 new single-family homes were sold (at a seasonally adjusted annual rate) at a median sales price of $345,800. Imagine if most of these new home developments were net-zero energyProducing as much energy on an annual basis as one consumes on site, usually with renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics or small-scale wind turbines. (NZE), which not only delivers the homeowner annual energy savings but also enhances the overall performance, comfort, and resilience of these homes.

Bringing Passive House to Production Building

Posted on November 6, 2017 by Zack Semke in Guest Blogs

It’s clear to me that if we hope to avert catastrophic climate change we need to start viewing our buildings as clean energy power plants. As I’ll show you below, it’ll be easier than you think. Global experts emphasize three things: we face a climate crisis emergency; we have the means to solve the crisis; and our future depends on determined local climate action, now.

With reversals in the U.S. climate policy underway and the Paris climate agreement in question, it’s easy to lose sight of the fact that the clean energy transition is already underway.

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