The most recent blogs at Green Building Advisor

Position Yourself as an Expert Eco-Builder: Update Your Website

Posted on December 15, 2009 by Michael Strong, LEED Associate, CGP in Business Advisor

Rapid changes in the residential construction industry are providing new profit and diversification opportunities for builders. Those who see and understand these opportunities can position themselves as experts in the field and provide exemplary service to gain an important edge in the marketplace. Knowing where you stand in relation to your competition is paramount. Educating and communicating that position to prospective customers is equally important.

Part 5 of a 7-part series


5. Update your website

Exceeding the Energy Code

Posted on December 14, 2009 by Lynn Underwood in Code Green

9 Steps to A Greener Code

New homes built using the 2009 International Residential Code (IRCInternational Residential Code. The one- and two-family dwelling model building code copyrighted by the International Code Council. The IRC is meant to be a stand-alone code compatible with the three national building codes—the Building Officials and Code Administrators (BOCA) National code, the Southern Building Code Congress International (SBCCI) code and the International Conference of Building Officials (ICBO) code.) or International Energy Conservation Code (IECC International Energy Conservation Code.) will be more energy efficient than ever. As a consequence, a builder’s world may become a bit more complex and, in some cases, a bit more expensive.

Position Yourself as an Expert Eco-Builder: Embrace Technology

Posted on December 12, 2009 by Dina Lima in Business Advisor

Rapid changes in the residential construction industry are providing new profit and diversification opportunities for builders. Those who see and understand these opportunities can position themselves as experts in the field and provide exemplary service to gain an important edge in the marketplace. Knowing where you stand in relation to your competition is paramount. Educating and communicating that position to prospective customers is equally important.

Part 6 of a 7-part series


6. Embrace technology

Windows That Perform Better Than Walls

Posted on December 11, 2009 by Martin Holladay in Musings of an Energy Nerd

UPDATED on March 18, 2015

The common perception that windows are “energy holes” is a bad rap. Since today’s high-solar-gain triple-glazed windows gather more heat than they lose, good windows perform better than an insulated wall. After all, a wall can only lose energy, while windows can gain energy during the day to balance energy lost at night.

Presidents and Sweaters

Posted on December 10, 2009 by Carl Seville in Green Building Curmudgeon

Earlier this fall, on one of the first chilly days, I considered climbing into the crawlspace to light the pilot on my floor furnace, but decided it was easier to just put on a sweatshirt. The practically prehistoric furnace is part of the house I had intended to demolish as part of my derailed plans for a new house, so I have been putting up with it for a few years now.

Making the Case for Triple-Glazed Windows

Posted on December 8, 2009 by Alex Wilson in Energy Solutions

It won’t surprise many of my readers to learn that I’m a fanatic about energy conservation and efficiency. That goes back more than 30 years to the mid-70s. During those years I’ve paid a lot of attention to windows--and seen dramatic improvement in window performance.

Insulating Mechanical Pipes

Posted on December 7, 2009 by Lynn Underwood in Code Green

9 Steps to A Greener Code

New homes built using the 2009 International Residential Code (IRCInternational Residential Code. The one- and two-family dwelling model building code copyrighted by the International Code Council. The IRC is meant to be a stand-alone code compatible with the three national building codes—the Building Officials and Code Administrators (BOCA) National code, the Southern Building Code Congress International (SBCCI) code and the International Conference of Building Officials (ICBO) code.) or International Energy Conservation Code (IECC International Energy Conservation Code.) will be more energy efficient than ever. As a consequence, a builder’s world may become a bit more complex and, in some cases, a bit more expensive.

Position Yourself as an Expert Eco-Builder: Get Organized With a Homeowner's Manual

Posted on December 5, 2009 by Dina Lima in Business Advisor

Rapid changes in the residential construction industry are providing new profit and diversification opportunities for builders. Those who see and understand these opportunities can position themselves as experts in the field and provide exemplary service to gain an important edge in the marketplace. Knowing where you stand in relation to your competition is paramount. Educating and communicating that position to prospective customers is equally important.

Part 4 of a 7-part series


4. Get organized with a homeowner's manual

Efficient Windows

Posted on December 4, 2009 by Lynn Underwood in Code Green

9 Steps to A Greener Code

New homes built using the 2009 International Residential Code (IRCInternational Residential Code. The one- and two-family dwelling model building code copyrighted by the International Code Council. The IRC is meant to be a stand-alone code compatible with the three national building codes—the Building Officials and Code Administrators (BOCA) National code, the Southern Building Code Congress International (SBCCI) code and the International Conference of Building Officials (ICBO) code.) or International Energy Conservation Code (IECC International Energy Conservation Code.) will be more energy efficient than ever. As a consequence, a builder’s world may become a bit more complex and, in some cases, a bit more expensive.

Roofing and Siding Jobs Are Energy-Retrofit Opportunities

Posted on December 4, 2009 by Martin Holladay in Musings of an Energy Nerd

Unlike governments in Germany and the U.K., the U.S. government hasn’t yet enacted an energy policy aimed at addressing global climate change. As a result, prices for carbon-based fuels in the U.S. are far lower than in most European countries.

If Americans continue along our current energy path, wrenching climate change is almost inevitable. That’s why many energy experts advise Americans to prepare for the eventual implementation of steep carbon taxes on heating fuel and electricity.

One prominent environmental organization, the Union of Concerned Scientists, has called for an 80% reduction in U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, and two states (California and New Jersey) have adopted that target as a state goal. The 2030 Challenge, a program endorsed by the American Institute of Architects, sets a goal of implementing energy retrofits designed to reduce energy use by 50% at 1.5 million U.S. homes annually between now and 2030.

It's unclear whether the U.S. will be able to meet these challenging targets. But attaining the targets would require almost every U.S. home to under a deep-energy retrofit. In most cases, the work would require walls and roofs to be covered with a thick layer of exterior insulation.

The logical time to do this work is when siding or roofing is replaced.

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