The most recent blogs at Green Building Advisor

What Makes a City Green?

Posted on April 9, 2018 by Anonymous in Guest Blogs

By TRINA HAMILTON and WINIFRED CURRAN

There are many indexes that aim to rank how green cities are. But what does it actually mean for a city to be green or sustainable?

Reports from Owners of High-Performance Homes

Posted on April 6, 2018 by Martin Holladay in Musings of an Energy Nerd

At Green Building Advisor, we urge readers who are planning to build a new home to seek out a builder who understands energy-efficient construction methods. Is this advice easy to follow? And once the new owners move into their energy-efficient home, are they happy with the home’s performance?

New Life for Toxic Land

Posted on April 5, 2018 by Lynne Peeples in Guest Blogs

This post originally appeared at Ensia.

Awaiting Day Zero in Cape Town

Posted on April 4, 2018 by Adam Welz in Guest Blogs

This post originally appeared at Yale Environment 360.

Learning to Co-Exist With Wildfires

Posted on April 3, 2018 by Kendra Chamberlain in Green Building Blog

This post originally appeared at Ensia.

Does This Roof Need to Breathe?

Posted on April 2, 2018 by Scott Gibson in Q&A Spotlight

GBAGreenBuildingAdvisor.com reader Erik is building a new house in southwestern Washington state, and he's thought through most of the details with care. But as the time nears to install the standing-seam metal roof, Erik realizes he may have overlooked something important in the construction details.

Newspapers Trumpeted ‘Solar Homes’ in the 1940s

Posted on March 30, 2018 by Martin Holladay in Musings of an Energy Nerd

What’s a “solar house”? The phrase has been used since the 1940s to refer to a house with lots of south-facing glazingWhen referring to windows or doors, the transparent or translucent layer that transmits light. High-performance glazing may include multiple layers of glass or plastic, low-e coatings, and low-conductivity gas fill. — a type of house later called a “passive solar house.” The phrase is also used to refer to homes that include an active solar thermal system (one with collectors on the roof, along with pumps or fans). Finally, the phrase has recently been applied to homes with a photovoltaic(PV) Generation of electricity directly from sunlight. A photovoltaic cell has no moving parts; electrons are energized by sunlight and result in current flow. (PVPhotovoltaics. Generation of electricity directly from sunlight. A photovoltaic (PV) cell has no moving parts; electrons are energized by sunlight and result in current flow.) array on the roof.

The Global Boom to Come in New Housing

Posted on March 29, 2018 by Sean Smith in Green Building Blog

By the end of this century, the world’s population will have increased by half — that’s another 3.6 billion people. According to the UN, the global population is set to reach over 11.2 billion by the year 2100, up from the current population, which was estimated at the end of 2017 to be 7.6 billion. And that is considered to be “medium growth.”

Converting Heating and Cooling Loads to Air Flow Needs

Posted on March 28, 2018 by Allison A. Bailes III, PhD in Building Science

When you embark on the project of educating yourself about building science, one of the first things you encounter is the concept of heating and cooling loads. Every building has them. (Yes, even Passive House projects.) That's why we do heating and cooling load calculations. We enter all the details of the building, set the design conditions, and get the heating and cooling loads for each room in the building.

Greenwashed Timber: How Sustainable Forest Certification Has Failed

Posted on March 27, 2018 by Richard Conniff in Guest Blogs

This post first appeared at Yale Environment 360.

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