The most recent blogs at Green Building Advisor

The World Is Facing a Sand Crisis

Posted on September 28, 2017 by Anonymous in Guest Blogs

By Aurora Torres, Jianguo “Jack” Liu, Jodi Brandt, and Kristen Lear

Utilities Grapple with Rooftop Solar and the New Energy Landscape

Posted on September 27, 2017 by Jacques Leslie in Guest Blogs

In the prevailing narrative of the rooftop solar industry, the dominant theme is combat. The good guys are the innovative, climate-positive, customer-pleasing solar companies, which must be nimble to avoid being crushed by the plodding, influence-buying, fossil fuel-spewing dinosaurs of the electricity industry, the utilities.

Are Hazardous Vapors Seeping Into Your Basement?

Posted on September 26, 2017 by Lynne Peeples in Guest Blogs

When Jane Horton bought her dream 800-square-foot farmhouse in 1975, she thought little of the semiconductor manufacturing plant across the street. Even after the company’s buildings were demolished and a chain-link fence went up around the campus, she still had no knowledge of the toxic dangers lurking beneath her feet — let alone of the fact that they were invading her home.

Urban Rustic: A Light Down Below

Posted on September 25, 2017 by Eric Whetzel in Guest Blogs

Editor's note: This post is one of a series by Eric Whetzel about the design and construction of his house in Palatine, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. The first blog in his series was called An Introduction to a New Passive House Project; a list of Eric's previous posts appears below. For more details, see Eric's blog, Kimchi & Kraut.

GBA Prime Sneak Peek: Bathroom Design

Posted on September 22, 2017 by Martin Holladay in Green Building Blog

GBAGreenBuildingAdvisor.com Prime subscribers have access to many articles that aren't accessible to non-subscribers, including Martin Holladay's weekly blog series, “Musings of an Energy Nerd.” To whet the appetite of non-subscribers, we occasionally offer non-subscribers access to a “GBA Prime Sneak Peek” article like this one.

Bathroom Design

Posted on September 22, 2017 by Martin Holladay in Musings of an Energy Nerd

Americans who grew up in the 1950s or early 60s (that includes me) remember living in a house with one bathroom. There was usually someone standing outside the door yelling, “Hurry up!”

These days, most Americans live in (or aspire to live in) a house with two or more bathrooms. My guess is that we’re never going to return to the bathroom standards of the 1950s; two-bathroom houses are probably here to stay.

Pete’s Product Puzzle: VersaDry

Posted on September 21, 2017 by Peter Yost in Building Science

I first “learned” about VersaDry when a colleague of mine here at BuildingGreen — our materials and product expert, Brent Ehrlich — sent me the photo reproduced at right. I was in the same boat you are right now: “OK, thanks for the photo, Brent, but what the hell is this VersaDry bent-metal thingamajig?”

He replied, “Oh, yeah, here is another photo that will help.” This time he sent me the photo reproduced as Image #2, below.

Thinking Clearly About the 3 Levels of the Building Enclosure

Posted on September 20, 2017 by Allison A. Bailes III, PhD in Building Science

When you approach the subject of building science, especially regarding heat, air, and moisture flows through a building enclosure, it's easy to get confused. There's a lot to learn: blower door testing, insulation grading, R-value, vapor permeance, radiant barriers, combustion safety, solar heat gain coefficients, and on and on. That's why we break things down into simpler pieces.

Batteries Included

Posted on September 19, 2017 by Bronwyn Barry in Guest Blogs

Almost everyone has a story about receiving an awesome gift, only to find they couldn’t use it until hours later because the box lacked one essential item — the battery. Remember the frustration, and how easily that manufacturer could have made you happy if they weren’t so cheap?

How to Vent a Rainscreen

Posted on September 18, 2017 by Scott Gibson in Q&A Spotlight

A vented rainscreenConstruction detail appropriate for all but the driest climates to prevent moisture entry and to extend the life of siding and sheathing materials; most commonly produced by installing thin strapping to hold the siding away from the sheathing by a quarter-inch to three-quarters of an inch. — an air gap behind the siding — has become a standard detail in many new houses. It helps remove moisture that works its way through the siding, and in the process helps siding last longer. It's the "vented" part of this equation that has Gerald Pehl thinking.

"I've got an assembly design for a vented rainscreen, and it will be held continuous to the soffit spaces, which then vent through to the attic ridge vent via conventional vent chutes between the rafters," Pehl says in a comment posted in the Q&A forum at GBAGreenBuildingAdvisor.com.

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