Retrofit for Radon Vent

The toughest details are those that have to match up with someone else's work, or those done — even done well — when energy was really cheap. These details are a collection of some common — and tough — dovetails of existing work with retrofits or additions. Bear in mind that green remodeling means creating a new operating regime that is better, not worse, than the one that may well have been working just fine before. Integration of energy efficiency, moisture management, and indoor air quality is much more important and challenging in remodeling than in new construction.

Foundations, Floors, and Walls Are Critical Green Connections

Air sealing is imperative. The connection between concrete foundations and wood framing is a place prone to air leaks and moisture problems. Wood is often warped, and concrete is rarely flat. There are at least three places for air to leak in and probably a lot more. Leaky connections can mean energy, moisture, comfort, and IAQIndoor air quality. Healthfulness of an interior environment; IAQ is affected by such factors as moisture and mold, emissions of volatile organic compounds from paints and finishes, formaldehyde emissions from cabinets, and ventilation effectiveness. problems. Extending the wall sheathingMaterial, usually plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), but sometimes wooden boards, installed on the exterior of wall studs, rafters, or roof trusses; siding or roofing installed on the sheathing—sometimes over strapping to create a rainscreen. past these connections is a good first step whenever practical. Caulks, adhesives, spray foam, and gaskets can seal them up tightly.

Keep water at bay

Unless you live in the desert, the ground is always wet; and that ground water is always pushing its way in. Footing drains can carry away bulk groundwater, but foundations also have to disrupt capillarity. Water in the soil will wick all the way up to the roof framing if you let it. CapillaryForces that lift water or pull it through porous materials, such as concrete. The tendency of a material to wick water due to the surface tension of the water molecules. breaks such as brush-on damp-proofing, sill sealer, and rigid insulation block this process. A foundation is a bad place to cut corners because problems are expensive and complicated to fix after a house is finished.

It can cost 5 to 10 times more to retrofit a radonColorless, odorless, short-lived radioactive gas that can seep into homes and result in lung cancer risk. Radon and its decay products emit cancer-causing alpha, beta, and gamma particles. mitigation system than it does to do it during new construction. And there is no real way to predict what radon levels will be in a home, even with good soil mapping of radon. A straight chase from foundation to roof is important for passive radon systems (relying only on stack effectAlso referred to as the chimney effect, this is one of three primary forces that drives air leakage in buildings. When warm air is in a column (such as a building), its buoyancy pulls colder air in low in buildings as the buoyant air exerts pressure to escape out the top. The pressure of stack effect is proportional to the height of the column of air and the temperature difference between the air in the column and ambient air. Stack effect is much stronger in cold climates during the heating season than in hot climates during the cooling season.) and for hiding active ones (those with a depressurizationSituation that occurs within a house when the indoor air pressure is lower than that outdoors. Exhaust fans, including bath and kitchen fans, or a clothes dryer can cause depressurization, and it may in turn cause back drafting as well as increased levels of radon within the home. fan).

For more information on radon and radon mitigation, see All About Radon.

DRAWING DETAIL

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2.
Mon, 03/28/2011 - 16:56

Radon mitigation system design
by Peter Yost

Hey Richard -

Good question. The best I can do is refer you to this document from the EPA: Build Radon Out - http://www.epa.gov/radon/pdfs/buildradonout.pdf. See pages 38 and 39.

Hope this helps.

Peter


1.
Mon, 03/28/2011 - 16:10

Radon mitigation
by Richard Clark

How much perforated pipe should you run. I have not been able to find any plans w/ recomendations. Only one piece of advice that each area sectioned off by a footing should be serviced.