Windows and Skylights

Extending Window Openings for a Deep Energy Retrofit

Posted on March 29,2015 by AlexWilson in deep energy retrofit

A few weeks ago I reported on the amazing, high-tech Alpen, R-12 (center-of-glass) windows that we installed on the north and west facades of our farmhouse in Dummerston, Vermont. At that time I promised to report on the other windows we were installing on the south and east facades (windows 2.0 if you will).

Wasco Skylights to Open New Plant in Nevada

Posted on March 29,2015 by ScottG in manufacturing

Wasco Skylights will open a new manufacturing facility in Reno, Nevada, by next April in hopes of expanding its distribution west of the Rocky Mountains and keeping pace with industry giant Velux, company CEO Jeff Frank says. About 5% of Wasco's business now comes from the dozen states west of the Rocky Mountains, Frank says, a market that represents about 26% of all construction spending.

Do Europeans Make Better Windows Than We Do?

Posted on March 29,2015 by ScottG in Passivhaus window

It should come as no surprise that Europe, home of the Passivhaus standard, produces some outstanding windows. Some builders of high-efficiency houses in North America turn to European window manufacturers for their glazing, even though some U.S. and Canadian producers also offer high-performance products of their own. Is there a way to compare the performance data on windows from these two sources? That’s what Steve Young, now planning a Passive House in Climate Zone 5, would like to know.

Rating Windows for Condensation Resistance

Posted on March 29,2015 by user-756436 in AAMA

Condensation forms on a surface when the temperature of the surface is below the dew point of the air. During the winter, when the coldest surface in a room is often the window, it’s fairly common to see water droplets or ice on window glass — especially in a room with elevated indoor humidity. Condensation is more likely to form when indoor relative humidity is high. That’s why it’s more common to see condensation on a bathroom window than a bedroom window.

Looking Through Windows — Part 6

Posted on March 29,2015 by user-961160 in Bieber

[Editor's note: Roger and Lynn Normand are building a [no-glossary]Passivhaus[/no-glossary] in Maine. This is the tenth article in a series that will follow their project from planning through construction.] Enough suspense on windows. It’s a Bieber! And yes, that’s our final decision. We’ve made a sizable cash deposit and started precise shop drawings for the windows.

Looking Through Windows — Part 5

Posted on March 29,2015 by user-961160 in passive house

[Editor's note: Roger and Lynn Normand are building a [no-glossary]Passivhaus[/no-glossary] in Maine. This is the ninth article in a series that will follow their project from planning through construction.] Strike up the band: we have – finally – achieved the Passivhaus standard with Unilux windows! Marc Rosenbaum, our energy consultant, ran the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) energy modeling software and arrived at a heat load of 4.74 KBTU/sq. ft./year, a mere 0.01 below the 4.75 limit. Talk about a photo-finish squeaker!

Looking Through Windows — Part 4

Posted on March 29,2015 by user-961160 in passive house

[Editor's note: Roger and Lynn Normand are building a [no-glossary]Passivhaus[/no-glossary] in Maine. This is the eighth article in a series that will follow their project from planning through construction.] We have been comparing two window options for EdgewaterHaus: German-manufactured Unilux windows, and Canadian-made windows from Thermotech Fiberglass. I’ll talk about Thermotech in this blog; a previous blog discussed our impressions of the Unilux windows.

Looking Through Windows — Part 2

Posted on March 29,2015 by user-961160 in Passivhaus window

[Editor's note: Roger and Lynn Normand are building a [no-glossary]Passivhaus[/no-glossary] in Maine. This is the sixth article in a series that will follow their project from planning through construction.]

Looking Through Windows — Part 1

Posted on March 29,2015 by user-961160 in glazing

[Editor's note: Roger and Lynn Normand are building a [no-glossary]Passivhaus[/no-glossary] in Maine. This is the fifth article in a series that will follow their project from planning through construction.] When we first began looking at windows for our Passivhaus project, we started with a list of 15 window manufacturers. We whittled the list down to two: Schüco, which on paper looked like the best European-style window, and Pella, the best North American style window.

Insulated Storm Windows?

Posted on March 29,2015 by AlexWilson in SHGC

I’ve done a lot of digging into window options in the past few months — not only for a special report on windows that BuildingGreen published, but also for the renovation of the early-19th-Century farmhouse that my wife and I recently purchased.

Cool Window and Glazing Products from the AIA Convention

Posted on March 29,2015 by AlexWilson in BIPV

I just spent three days at the American Institute of Architects annual convention in Washington, DC, including a fair amount of time at the massive trade show there. I didn’t make it all the way through the acres of exhibits over the eight hours or so I walked the floor, but I saw some really interesting products. I’m highlighting here a few of the windows and glazing-related products I found.

An Opportunity for Users to Rate Window Manufacturers

Posted on March 29,2015 by GBA Team in customer service

By Martin Holladay Everybody has an opinion on windows, it seems. When specifying windows, builders usually look for good customer service. Most builders want a local rep who answers the phone, provides quick turnarounds on bids, delivers windows on time, and promptly shows up on site when something goes wrong. Homeowners want windows that look good, operate smoothly, and don't fall apart. Energy nerds want windows with excellent performance specifications.

Window Performance 4 — Dealing with Edge Losses

Posted on March 29,2015 by AlexWilson in double glazing

Over the last three weeks I've focused on the major strategies for improving the energy performance of windows: adding extra layers of glass, increasing the thickness of the airspace between the layers of glass, adding low-emissivity coatings, and replacing air with a low-conductivity gas fill. These strategies all help to reduce heat flow through an insulating glass unit (IGU), and if we do a really good job with these strategies we can achieve center-of-glass R-values of R-5 or higher.

Window Performance — Part 3

Posted on March 29,2015 by AlexWilson in argon

Over the last two weeks I've covered the major strategies for improving the energy performance of windows: adding extra layers of glass, increasing the thickness of the air space between the layers of glass, and adding low-emissivity coatings. Another important strategy is to use a low-conductivity gas instead of air in the space between the layers of glass. Most commonly argon is used, though krypton is available for the highest-performance windows, and xenon is occasionally used.

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