Exterior Finish & Trim

Exterior Finish & Trim

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Recycling Vinyl Siding

Even though wood, gypsum board, and cardboard make up 75% of most job-site waste, recycling vinyl siding can be an important part of a construction or demolition waste management plan

Posted on Mar 10 2011 by Peter Yost

In 1998, while at the NAHBNational Association of Home Builders, which awards a Model Green Home Certification. Reseach Center, I worked on a vinylCommon term for polyvinyl chloride (PVC). In chemistry, vinyl refers to a carbon-and-hydrogen group (H2C=CH–) that attaches to another functional group, such as chlorine (vinyl chloride) or acetate (vinyl acetate). siding recycling project in Grand Rapids, MI. It was pretty simple: siding installers stuffed their cut-off waste into the long cardboard boxes the new siding came in, and back-hauled both to the same place they bought their vinyl siding stock. There, the vinyl cut-offs were placed in one container and the cardboard in another. The vinyl cut-offs were baled and when a 40,000-pound load was accumulated, a plastics broker would negotiate a price for the tractor-trailer load.

Recycling vinyl siding


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Image Credits:

  1. Eikenhout, Inc.

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Where Does the Housewrap Go?

If your walls have exterior rigid foam, does the housewrap go under the foam or over the foam?

Posted on Feb 18 2011 by Martin Holladay

Let’s say you’re building a house with plywood or OSB sheathingMaterial, usually plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), but sometimes wooden boards, installed on the exterior of wall studs, rafters, or roof trusses; siding or roofing installed on the sheathing—sometimes over strapping to create a rainscreen. . You plan to install 2 or 4 inches of rigid foam on the exterior of the wall sheathing, followed by vertical rainscreenConstruction detail appropriate for all but the driest climates to prevent moisture entry and to extend the life of siding and sheathing materials; most commonly produced by installing thin strapping to hold the siding away from the sheathing by a quarter-inch to three-quarters of an inch. strapping and siding. Where does the housewrap go?

Depending on who you talk to, you get two different answers:

  • It goes between the rigid foam and the vertical strapping, or
  • It goes between the sheathing and the rigid foam.

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Image Credits:

  1. GreenBuildingAdvisor

Green Design and Planning

Green Building and Remodeling Begins with Design and Construction Planning

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The building lot sets the stage for savings

Integrated designBuilding design in which different components of design, such as the building envelope, window placement and glazings, and mechanical systems are considered together. High-performance buildings and renovations can be created cost-effectively using integrated design, since higher costs one place can often be paid for through savings elsewhere, for example by improving the performance of the building envelope, the heating and cooling systems can be downsized, or even eliminated. teams look for opportunities to incorporate energy efficiency based on what nature can give them, but other opportunities typically appear as the job progresses.

Ratings are a scorecard, but they don't make it green

You don't need a green sealIndependent, nonprofit organization that certifies a variety of products as environmentally responsible based on established criteria. Certified products include coffee filters, air chillers, paints and coatings, papers and newsprint, various cleaning products and services, windows and doors, and lodging properties. of approval in order to build or remodel green. In fact, many builders of successful green homes don't bother enrolling the homes in a green rating program. However, most builders who use a rating system appreciate the marketing advantages of a green label. If the green rating program is well designed, it can also help designers and builders build better homes.

Job sites: leaner, cleaner, and greener

Green job sites generate less waste to begin with and incorporate recycling right into the work flow.

The end product—green homes—are healthy, efficient, affordable, and good-looking.

Tab 1

Green Products and Materials

Green products don't make it green. But at some point, you need products and materials to build a house, so you might as well make wise choices.

Specifying products inevitably involves compromises. For example, builders interested in minimizing the use of materials made from petrochemicals may still choose to insulate a basement wall with rigid foam because of its excellent thermal performance and durability when installed below grade.

Similarly, choosing between 2x12 rafters from a local sawmill and I-joist rafters made in a distant factory requires weighing the advantages and disadvantages of local sourcing versus logging practices that make efficient use of small trees.

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Integrated Design

Integrated design is a collaborative approach that treats the group of people building a house as a team rather than as independent freelancers.

Anyone with experience in residential construction is familiar with examples of home designs that failed to consider the requirements of certain subcontractors. Classic examples include:

  • mechanical rooms that are too small to accomodate the necessary equipment (or so small that, once installed, the equipment is so crowded that maintenance is almost impossible);
  • designs without any provision for the location of ductwork (for example, structural beams that interrupt joist bays where ducts might logically be located).

Bringing trade contractors into the design process is an excellent example of integrated design. Done well, the integrated design process results in a better house.

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A green job site

A truly green job site requires the application of integrated designBuilding design in which different components of design, such as the building envelope, window placement and glazings, and mechanical systems are considered together. High-performance buildings and renovations can be created cost-effectively using integrated design, since higher costs one place can often be paid for through savings elsewhere, for example by improving the performance of the building envelope, the heating and cooling systems can be downsized, or even eliminated. principles at every phase of construction, so that all trades work together to acheive a common goal. That goal should include minimizing job-site waste. Reducing potential waste and recycling as much as possible helps lower costs and reduce the environmental impact of construction.

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Using less wood and other building materials is good for everyone

Resource efficiency includes minimizing the use of materials and minimizing waste during construction. It also requires the design of a house that uses minimal amounts of energy and water.

Perhaps the easiest way to accomplish all of these goals is to build as small a house as possible.


OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

Develop A Green Consensus

It's hard for a design and construction team to work towards a common goal unless the team members agree on a definition of green building.

There's no single definition of green building. It's perfectly acceptable for your design team to have a definition that differs from that of other builders — as long as everyone on your team has the same basic goals in mind.

You can refine your own definition of green building by reading through our Green Building Primer.

GREEN POINTS

LEED for HOMESLeadership in Energy and Environmental Design. LEED for Homes is the residential green building program from the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). While this program is primarily designed for and applicable to new home projects, major gut rehabs can qualify. Up to 3 points for integrated project planning (ID1) and 3 points available for durability management (ID2), which is a critical aspect of integrated planning. MR1 (Materials & Resources) offers up to 4 points for advanced framingHouse-framing techniques in which lumber use is optimized, saving material and improving the energy performance of the building envelope.. MR3 has up to 3 points for construction-waste reduction. Earn an innovation point (ID3) for outstanding diversion during deconstruction (existing building).

NGBSNational Green Building Standard Based on the NAHB Model Green Home Building Guidelines and passed through ANSI. This standard can be applied to both new homes, remodeling projects, and additions. Under Ch. 4 — Site Design & Development: 4 points for knowledgeable team, clear roles, written mission statement (402.1); 3 points for training on-site team (402.2); green development practice checklist — 3 points (402.3); up to 10 points for density of development (403.12). Under Ch. 6 — Resource Efficiency: 7 points for construction waste management planPlan that addresses the collection and disposal of waste generated during construction or renovation, usually including the collection and storage of recyclable materials. (605.1); 7 points for minimum 50% on-site recycling (grinding & site application) of construction and land clearing waste (605.2); 3 points for off-site recycling of 3 materials (additional points for each additional material recycled) (605.3); up to 15 points for home size < 2500 sq. ft. (601.1).

ABOUT GREEN DESIGN

Meet early and often

Every green home, no matter how simple, requires a design process. Owner-builders who manage to design and build a home single-handedly are relatively rare, so most green homes are collaborative efforts. The best results happen when designers, contractors, and subcontractors work together as a team.

Integrated Design involves all the stakeholders
Early in the process, a team meeting should set the tone for the project. Ideally, the team ethic will permeate the job site, which makes cooperation easier. This means that everyone stays on the same page with respect to the goals of the project, including recycling and minimizing waste.

ABOUT GREEN RATING SYSTEMS

Choose a rating system that meets your needs best

Some (but not all) green homes are enrolled in a green rating program. There are a few national rating programs, and many local green programs. In some parts of the country, builders can choose between four or more green rating systems. This multiplicity of parallel programs inevitably causes confusion, but can also offer flexibility in choosing between systems that better suit the goals of team members. Over the next few years, some programs may be sorted out as the marketplace picks favorites.

ABOUT GREEN JOB SITES

What Makes A Green Job Site Different?

Workers at green job sites follow principles that may be missing from traditional job sites:
They look for ways to reduce waste.
They look for ways to re-use waste on site.
They’re committed to recycling.
They’re committed to integrated designBuilding design in which different components of design, such as the building envelope, window placement and glazings, and mechanical systems are considered together. High-performance buildings and renovations can be created cost-effectively using integrated design, since higher costs one place can often be paid for through savings elsewhere, for example by improving the performance of the building envelope, the heating and cooling systems can be downsized, or even eliminated. priciples which help them work as a team to achieve common green goals.

FURTHER RESOURCES

Building Science Corp:
Towards Sustainability
Prioritizing Green—It's the Energy Stupid
Read This Before You Design, Build, or Renovate


Image Credits:

  1. Roe A. Osborn/Fine Homebuilding
  2. Justin Fink/Fine Homebuilding #170
  3. Daniel Morrison
  4. Rob Wotzak
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Siding Choices

Siding Is the First Defense Against the Elements

UPDATED 3/4/2013

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Your first defense against the weather

Siding has both decorative and functional purposes, but some of the options come with a heavy environmental price tag. Choose a durable product that is low in toxicity and can be manufactured sustainably. The layers you don't see, such as housewraps, drainage mats, and insulated sheathingMaterial, usually plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), but sometimes wooden boards, installed on the exterior of wall studs, rafters, or roof trusses; siding or roofing installed on the sheathing—sometimes over strapping to create a rainscreen. panels, are just as important for durability and weatherization. Getting siding details right may be the most important step in creating a durable home — especially where roofs, decks, and porches make penetrations.

See below for:

STOPPING RAIN THAT GETS PAST THE SIDING

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Local wood is a green choice

Wood siding, a first choice in some regions, is easy to work with, nontoxic, and completely biodegradable, depending on its finish. Some species are maintenance-free, but most need regular coats of paint. Back venting wood siding can make the paint last longer.

The greenest wood siding is harvested sustainably.

ABOUT WOOD SIDING

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Stucco and synthetic stucco

are extremely durable wall finish materials, as long as they are installed with details to handle moisture intrusion. Exterior insulation and finish system (EIFS), also called synthetic stucco, is a modern alternative to stucco that combines a polymer claddingMaterials used on the roof and walls to enclose a house, providing protection against weather. with a substrate of polystyrene insulation.

ABOUT STUCCO AND SYNTHETIC STUCCO

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Insects are not a concern, but moisture is

Low-maintenance, highly durable brick veneer is also fire- and insect-resistant. As with stucco, brick veneer needs to be installed with details that are designed to address moisture intrusion.

ABOUT BRICK VENEER

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Stone and synthetic stone

Facing a wood-framed building with stone or synthetic stone is a good way to get the look of traditional masonry at a lower cost than traditional construction methods. Both materials are fire- and insect-resistant, need very little maintenance, and are among the most durable wall claddings available — as long as flashing and moisture details are well thought out and executed.

ABOUT STONE AND SYNTHETIC STONE

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Durable, but the details of its manufacture are controversial

Fiber-cement (cementitious) siding has some real durability advantages but isn’t the easiest type to install. Two of fiber cement's ingredients raise a few environmental concerns — Portland cement, due to the energy required by its production, and wood fiber, due to sourcing and transportation costs — but almost every home already includes them. Some manufacturers are using alternative components that make their products greener.

ABOUT FIBER CEMENT SIDING

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Vinyl: Loved and hated

Homeowners love it for its low maintenance requirements and modest installation cost, and vinyl siding performs extremely well from a moisture-management perspective. But it has the same environmental drawbacks as other products made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC).

ABOUT VINYL SIDING
Pro/Con article: Is Vinyl Green?


OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

Plan for wetness
Getting siding details right may be the most important step in creating a durable home. All siding types leak, but leaks may also occur where siding abuts other building materials, such as roofing or a masonry chimney. Potential trouble areas include any penetration through a wall, such as at windows, doors, decks, porches or additions. The installation of the layers you don't see behind the siding, such as housewraps, drainage mats, and insulated sheathingMaterial, usually plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), but sometimes wooden boards, installed on the exterior of wall studs, rafters, or roof trusses; siding or roofing installed on the sheathing—sometimes over strapping to create a rainscreen. panels, are just as important for durability and weatherization.

DRAWING LIBRARY CONSTRUCTION DETAILS

Siding Details
Roof/Siding Details

GREEN POINTS

LEED–H MR2.2 (Materials & Resources) offers 1/2 point for environmentally preferable siding, including FSCNonprofit organization that promotes forestry practices that are sustainable from environmental and social standpoints; FSC certification on a wood product is an indicator that the wood came from a well-managed forest., salvaged, and recycled-content options; 1/2 point more if it is locally sourced.

NGBSNational Green Building Standard Based on the NAHB Model Green Home Building Guidelines and passed through ANSI. This standard can be applied to both new homes, remodeling projects, and additions. Under Chapter 6, "Resource Efficiency": weather-resistive barrier (WRB mandatory (602.9); up to 6 points for insect-resistant materials (602.8); up to 2 points for siding that does not require site-applied finish (601.7); up to 8 points if siding contributes as a bio-based component (606.1).

ABOUT SIDING

Durable, low-maintenance siding is best

Durable siding requiring little maintenance is the appropriate choice for a green home.

Siding is an important architectural feature. There are half a dozen major families of siding, and many variations within those categories. Some are strong regional favorites, either because they are well suited to the climate or because they have a long local history (usually both).

In addition to durability, criteria for choosing siding include cost, maintenance requirements, ease of installation, and environmental impact.

ABOUT RAINSCREENS

Stopping rain that gets past the siding

Even the best claddingMaterials used on the roof and walls to enclose a house, providing protection against weather. will fail if it is installed improperly. The performance of all of the materials listed above depends on the quality of installation, including the water-resistive barrierSometimes also called the weather-resistive barrier, this layer of any wall assembly is the material interior to the wall cladding that forms a secondary drainage plane for liquid water that makes it past the cladding. This layer can be building paper, housewrap, or even a fluid-applied material., flashing, and back-venting (or rainscreen) details that allow the siding to dry properly from the back. (For more information on WRBs, see All About Water-Resistive Barriers.)

In most cases, the investment in a rainscreen siding installation pays dividends in paint longevity and siding durability.

VinylCommon term for polyvinyl chloride (PVC). In chemistry, vinyl refers to a carbon-and-hydrogen group (H2C=CH–) that attaches to another functional group, such as chlorine (vinyl chloride) or acetate (vinyl acetate). siding is inherently well ventilated and always has air behind it. Brick veneer, if installed according to code requirements, always includes a ventilated air space between it and the sheathingMaterial, usually plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), but sometimes wooden boards, installed on the exterior of wall studs, rafters, or roof trusses; siding or roofing installed on the sheathing—sometimes over strapping to create a rainscreen. . Neither vinyl siding nor masonry veneers needs a rainscreen.

Siding without a rainscreen
Other types of siding — wood clapboard, cedar shingles, fiber-cement — are often fastened tight to the sheathing with no intervening air space. Such installations can perform well, especially in a dry climate or on a wall that is protected by a wide roof overhang. But such installations are less forgiving than rainscreen installations, and often experience premature paint failure. If one or two things go wrong, walls without a rainscreen can trap moisture and begin to rot. For more information on what can go wrong if a wall is poorly detailed, see All About Wall Rot.

When stucco is installed on a wood-framed wall, a rainscreen is always recommended. For more information on stucco installation, see To Install Stucco Right, Include an Air Gap.

To create a rainscreen, first install a layer of asphalt felt or housewrap over the sheathing. The wrap must be carefully integrated with window and door flashing. For horizontal siding like wood clapboards or fiber-cement, an air space can be created by installing vertical strapping over each stud. A variety of materials can be used for strapping, including 1x3 lumber, rips of 1/4-inch plywood, or plastic battens.

For panel siding, cedar shingles, or stucco, create an air space with a three-dimensional plastic mat (for example, Cedar Breather) or a plastic dimple sheet.

For more information on rainscreen installations, see All About Rainscreens.

FURTHER RESOURCES

All About Water-Resistive Barriers

All About Wall Rot

All About Rainscreens


Image Credits:

  1. Daniel S. Morrison/Fine Homebuilding
  2. Dan Thornton/Fine Homebuilding #177
  3. Don Mannes/Fine Homebuilding #162
  4. Don Mannes/Fine Homebuilding #142
  5. Dan Thornton/Fine Homebuilding #192
  6. Roe A. Osborn/Fine Homebuilding #140
  7. Tom O'Brien and David Ericson/Fine Homebuilding #149
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