cold OSB

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Two Views of Double-Stud Walls

John Straube and Jesse Thompson talk about double-stud walls and risk

Posted on Apr 7 2017 by Martin Holladay
prime

At the recent BuildingEnergy 17 conference in Boston, there were at least two presentations that touched on double-stud walls. John Straube, a professor of building envelopeExterior components of a house that provide protection from colder (and warmer) outdoor temperatures and precipitation; includes the house foundation, framed exterior walls, roof or ceiling, and insulation, and air sealing materials. science at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, used his presentation to raise a warning flag, noting that “these walls will work if everything works — if there aren’t any defects — but they don’t work if there is something wrong.”


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Image Credits:

  1. Image #1: Peter Amerongen / Riverdale Net Zero
  2. Image #2: Thomas Haavi, Bjørn Petter Jelle, Arild Gustavsen, Steinar Grynning, Sivert Uvsløkk, Ruben Baetens, and Roland Caps
  3. Image #3: Eco Village, Ithaca, New York
  4. Image #4: Paul Biebel, Prudent Living Homes
  5. Image #5: Carter Scott

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Is Cold Sheathing in Double-Wall Construction at Risk?

Building Science Corporation's latest publication on the topic provides a surprising result

Posted on Apr 22 2015 by Allison A. Bailes III, PhD
prime

Insulation is good. More insulation is better (although at some point, more may not be cost-effective). It reduces the amount of heat a home loses in winter or gains in summer.


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Image Credits:

  1. Building Science Corporation

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Monitoring Moisture Levels in Double-Stud Walls

Is there any evidence that double-stud walls have damp sheathing?

Posted on Nov 1 2013 by Martin Holladay

Most wood-framed buildings have no insulation on the exterior side of the wall sheathingMaterial, usually plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), but sometimes wooden boards, installed on the exterior of wall studs, rafters, or roof trusses; siding or roofing installed on the sheathing—sometimes over strapping to create a rainscreen. . That means that the wall sheathing gets cold and wet during the winter.


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Image Credits:

  1. Kohta Ueno - Building Science Corporation
  2. Kohta Ueno
  3. Lois Arena - Building America
  4. Andy Shapiro
  5. Building Science Corporation

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Choosing the Right Wall Assembly (2013)

In a double-stud wall, will batt insulation accumulate moisture?

Posted on Feb 25 2013 by Scott Gibson

Michael Roland is designing a new house and trying to choose the right wall assembly. It’s down to a choice between a double-stud wallConstruction system in which two layers of studs are used to provide a thicker-than-normal wall system so that a lot of insulation can be installed; the two walls are often separated by several inches to reduce thermal bridging through the studs and to provide additional space for insulation. filled with fluffy insulation, or a single wall wrapped in a layer of rigid foam insulation.


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Image Credits:

  1. Lucas Durand

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How Risky Is Cold OSB Wall Sheathing?

The thicker your wall, the colder your sheathing. If you build a very thick wall, will your sheathing stay cold and wet?

Posted on Nov 5 2010 by Martin Holladay

During the winter months, wall sheathingMaterial, usually plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), but sometimes wooden boards, installed on the exterior of wall studs, rafters, or roof trusses; siding or roofing installed on the sheathing—sometimes over strapping to create a rainscreen. is usually cold. Cold sheathing is risky, since it tends to accumulate moisture during the winter. Unless the sheathing can dry out during the summer months, damp sheathing can rot.


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Image Credits:

  1. GreenBuildingAdvisor

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