combustion air

Providing Outdoor Combustion Air for a Wood Stove

Posted on January 29,2015 by westychris in air sealing

In November 2012, I started on a deep energy retrofit of my 1976 raised ranch in northwestern Vermont, in the shadow of Mount Mansfield. As a Passive House consultant, I wanted to make my leaky (8.25 ach50) house with fiberglass-filled 2x4 walls and a tuck-under garage much more energy-efficient.

Sealed-Combustion Appliances and Hot Tub Parties

Posted on January 29,2015 by user-1048334 in atmospherically vented

Sealed-combustion appliances are apt to become more common as the new energy codes introduce residential airtightness standards. This means that you’ll need to pay close attention to heating system safety. Fortunately, the new codes lay out explicit guidelines for combustion appliances. Building and energy codes often get adopted piecemeal around the country. In Maine, we’ve adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), but have exempted towns below a certain population level.

How to Provide Makeup Air for a Wood Stove

Posted on January 29,2015 by ScottG in combustion air

Wood stoves used to be pretty uncomplicated devices. Even though they weren’t airtight and they weren’t especially efficient, these cast-iron stoves warmed plenty of New England farmhouses in the dead of winter. Our forebears never considered the source of makeup air to replace all the heated combustion gases that were going up the flue. They didn’t need to, because back then, houses were leaky. As the stove burned its load of oak or maple, makeup air had no trouble finding its way into the house.

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