electricity generation

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How Dirty Is Your Electricity?

Here’s a look at the carbon intensity of electricity by state and region

Posted on Sep 21 2016 by Allison A. Bailes III, PhD
prime

Lately I've been working on my presentation for the 10th anniversary of the North American Passive House Conference. It's on the global warming impact of insulation, a followup to my latest article about Alex Wilson's work on that subject.


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Image Credits:

  1. Image #1: Walter / Flickr.com
  2. Images #2 and #3: Energy Vanguard, using eGRID data

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The Case for Nuclear Power — Despite the Risks

Just 99 nuclear plants in the U.S. provide one-fifth of the country’s electricity

Posted on Jun 16 2015 by Gary Was

Nuclear power is likely the least well understood energy source in the United States. Just 99 nuclear power plants spread over 30 states provide one-fifth of America’s electricity. These plants have provided reliable, affordable, and clean energy for decades. They also carry risk — to the public, to the environment, and to the financial solvency of utilities.


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Image Credits:

  1. Wikimedia Commons

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Vermont Legislators OK a Big Push for Renewables

The legislation will require 55% of utility sales to come from renewable energy sources by 2017, rising to 75% by 2032

Posted on May 22 2015 by Scott Gibson

Lawmakers in Vermont are backing legislation that would require more than half of all utility sales to come from renewable sources by 2017.

The Senate approved a bill that requires utilities to provide renewable electricity to customers and to come up with programs to help customers reduce their use of fossil fuels, The Burlington Free Press reported.


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Image Credits:

  1. Dennis Schroeder / NREL

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Rethinking the Grid

Producing electricity with decentralized sources offers advantages for consumers and the environment, but this approach will require some serious structural changes

Posted on Mar 3 2015 by Karl Rábago

Karl R. Rábago is the executive director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center at the Pace University School of Law in White Plains, New York. This blog was originally posted at the website of the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association's Building Energy conference and is republished here with permission. Rábago is a keynote speaker for the opening of the conference in Boston on March 4, 2015.


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Image Credits:

  1. Wikimedia Commons

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Bank Predicts Shift in European Power Picture

Centralized power stations will be become ‘dinosaurs’ as battery prices fall and new solar technologies are developed, UBS says

Posted on Aug 29 2014 by Scott Gibson

The world's largest bank is advising investors and clients that innovations in photovoltaic(PV) Generation of electricity directly from sunlight. A photovoltaic cell has no moving parts; electrons are energized by sunlight and result in current flow. (PVPhotovoltaics. Generation of electricity directly from sunlight. A photovoltaic (PV) cell has no moving parts; electrons are energized by sunlight and result in current flow.) technology and rapidly falling costs for batteries and PV equipment will eventually make large, centralized power generating stations in Europe obsolete.

UBS bank, based in Zurich, earlier this month produced a lengthy briefing paper that predicts that an investment in a combined electric vehicle / PV installation / battery system would pay for itself in as little as 6 to 8 years by 2020, without any subsidies.


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Image Credits:

  1. CarstenE via Wikimedia

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How Much Water Does it Take to Turn on a Light Bulb?

A look at the water intensity (or water footprint) of electricity generation

Posted on Apr 17 2014 by Alex Wilson

In last week's blog I took a look at some of the water conservation features in our new house, but I began the blog by addressing the relationship between water and energy. That got me curious, so I’ve been digging deeper into this water-energy nexus, examining the water-intensity of our different electricity sources.


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Image Credits:

  1. Scott Olson - Getty Images
  2. BrightSource Energy
  3. Stirling Energy Systems

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Using Ocean Temperature Variations to Generate Electricity

In China, a 10-megawatt power plant will take advantage of differences in ocean water temperatures at different depths

Posted on Apr 17 2013 by Scott Gibson

Lockheed Martin, the U.S. defense giant, has announced plans to build a 10-megawatt generating plant that uses variations in ocean water temperatures to generate electricity. The plant will be built off the coast of southern China.


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Image Credits:

  1. Lockheed Martin

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Spending a Day With Energy Policy Geeks

The Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance holds an meeting to discuss energy-efficiency programs

Posted on Dec 20 2011 by Carl Seville

I recently attended a small, one-day meeting in Atlanta of individuals and organizations involved in energy efficiency throughout the southeast U.S. Hosted by SEEA, the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance, the group responsible for distributing much of the ARRA money for efficiency throughout the region.


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