forced air

All About Furnaces and Duct Systems

Posted on April 19,2015 by user-756436 in condensing furnace

UPDATED on October 2, 2014 with more information on duct system design. Many different appliances can be used to heat a house, including boilers, water heaters, heat pumps, and wood stoves. However, most homes in the U.S. are heated by a forced-air furnace. These devices are connected to ducts that deliver heated air to registers throughout the house. Different types of furnaces are manufactured to burn a variety of fuels, including natural gas, propane, oil, and firewood. The most common furnace fuel in the U.S. is natural gas.

An Epidemic of Duct Disease and Enclosure Problems

Posted on April 19,2015 by ab3 in AC

When an air conditioner breaks down in hot weather, homeowners reach for their phone. The HVAC company then sends someone out to the home with the immediate goal of getting the AC running again so the occupants will cool off. The thing is, though, that most homes have problems that run deeper than the cause of the broken air conditioner.

Good Ducts, Bad Ducts

Posted on April 19,2015 by CarlSeville in duct

Whether they actually do it or not, I think almost everyone involved in high performance buildings recognizes that the best place to put our ducts is inside conditioned space. Most builders in my area haven’t made the change, and with the exception of the occasional house with an insulated basement, they still put most air handlers and ducts in the attic.

Should Flex Duct Be Banned?

Posted on April 19,2015 by ab3 in Bailes

Ah, flex duct. That bane of home performance contractors and green builders everywhere. If you’ve seen only one forced-air duct system that uses flex, you’ve most likely seen a bad installation.

Why Don’t More HVAC Contractors Own Duct Leakage Testers?

Posted on April 19,2015 by ab3 in Bailes

HVAC contractors own a lot of equipment. Of course, they have pressure gauges to test refrigerant charge in air conditioners and heat pumps, and many more pieces of technical equipment. One piece that few contractors own, however, is a duct leakage tester. With more and more state energy codes requiring duct leakage tests, doesn't it seem obvious that HVAC contractors need to be like plumbers and test their own work before passing it off?

How to Track Down Leaks in Forced-Air Ductwork

Posted on April 19,2015 by ScottG in duct

Leaky ducts in a forced-air heating and cooling system are an all-too-common problem contributing to significant energy losses and lower indoor air quality. Mark Renfrow knows that. Duct tests at his 3,400-sq. ft. home revealed “huge leakage.” A contractor addressed the problem by applying mastic to any accessible ductwork. But the key word is “accessible.” Many parts of the system apparently are not so easy to reach.

Stuff I Learned at Joe Lstiburek’s House, Part 2

Posted on April 19,2015 by ShelterNerd in duct

In the Southeast where I live and build, we mostly rely on ducted HVAC systems for heating and (especially) for cooling. So when I attended the Westford Building Science Symposium in early August, I was very excited to sit in on David Hill's presentation on HVAC systems, especially as Dr. Joe's introduction paraphrased Samuel Clemens’ observation: "It ain't so much the things we don't know that get us into trouble; it's the things we know that just ain't so."

Duct Leakage Testing

Posted on April 19,2015 by user-756436 in Duct Blaster

For years, Americans who would never put up with leaky plumbing pipes have been willing to accept leaky ducts. While water damage is hard to ignore, the damage caused by leaky ducts is more subtle. Yet leaky ducts not only waste huge amounts of energy — they can also lead to comfort complaints, moisture problems, mold, and rot.

Green Basics Heat Distribution
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