Georgia

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Topping Out

Framing is wrapping up, not without some hitches

Posted on Oct 4 2016 by Carl Seville

Carl Seville and his wife are building themselves a new home in Decatur, Georgia. The first blog in this series was titled The Third Time’s the Charm. Links to all of the blogs in this series can be found in the “Related Articles” sidebar below.


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  1. Carl Seville

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Georgia City Bucks Wood High-Rise Trend

In Sandy Springs, Georgia, wood structural components won't be allowed in large buildings over three stories tall

Posted on Sep 16 2016 by Scott Gibson

For some builders and architects, wood is the building material of the future, with lower costs and less embodied energyEnergy that goes into making a product; includes energy required for growth, extraction, and transportation of the raw material as well as manufacture, packaging, and transportation of the finished product. Embodied energy is often used to measure ecological cost. than concrete and steel and suitable even for structures many stories tall. But in Sandy Springs, Georgia, a city of about 100,000 north of Atlanta, wood has been deemed unsuitable for anything taller than three stories and larger than 100,000 square feet.


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  1. Scott Gibson

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Movin’ On Up

The foundation is in and framing is ready to start

Posted on Sep 5 2016 by Carl Seville

Carl Seville and his wife are building themselves a new home in Decatur, Georgia. The first blog in this series was titled The Third Time’s the Charm. Links to all of the blogs in this series can be found in the “Related Articles” sidebar below.


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Image Credits:

  1. All photos: Carl Seville

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The Sun Also Rises in the Southeast

After a slow start, the potential for clean power in Georgia and Florida is enormous

Posted on Jun 9 2015 by Luis Martinez

Anyone who's ever sat out on a Georgia afternoon or wandered outdoors in the bright Florida sunshine knows that the solar power potential in these two Southeastern states is enormous. Now, after a slow start, so is the headway that the clean power technology is making in the Southeast's two most populous states. "In 2011, if you told me we'd be where we are today with solar," says one Georgia solar advocate, "I would have laughed."


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Image Credits:

  1. John S. Quarterman

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Georgia Lawmakers OK Third-Party Solar Leasing

A measure that lifts some restrictions on third-party ownership of residential and business solar systems clears the legislature and heads to the governor's desk

Posted on Apr 8 2015 by Scott Gibson

In Georgia, lawmakers have approved a bill that for the first time will allow homeowners and businesses to lease photovoltaic (PV) systems rather than forcing them to buy the systems outright, according to published reports.

The Solar Power Free-Market Financing Act is designed to lower financial barriers that prevent some homeowners from adding solar, the website UtilityDive reports.


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Energy Code Enforcement is a Mixed Bag

Georgia’s required testing is a great start, but building inspectors need to step it up

Posted on Nov 29 2011 by Carl Seville

I’ve never been much of a code geek, but recently I’ve been studying the 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC International Energy Conservation Code.) documents. When I was a contractor, energy code enforcement by building officials was pretty much nonexistent, so I didn’t pay much attention to the specifics, although I’m fairly certain we met or exceeded the minimum requirements in our projects.


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Georgia Pulls the Attic-Ventilator Plug (Sort of)

The state residential code allows only solar-powered versions; plug-in powered attic ventilators will no longer be allowed

Posted on Aug 31 2011 by Richard Defendorf

Attic ventilator fans have taken a whupping in the court of building science, played starring roles on useless-products lists, and gotten roughed up in the comments sections of blogs. Now they’re gadget non grata in Georgia’s supplement to the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code.


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Image Credits:

  1. Florida Solar Energy Center

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Hot-Climate Design

Appropriate details help keep a house cool

Posted on Oct 9 2009 by Martin Holladay

People who live in Florida or Texas often accuse energy-efficiency experts of having a cold-climate bias. They’re right: most energy-saving tips are written with cold-climate buildings in mind — perhaps understandably, since Americans spend about twice as much for residential heating as they do for cooling.

Whatever the origins of this pervasive cold-climate bias, it’s time to rectify the situation with a few hot-climate design tips.


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Image Credits:

  1. Florida Solar Energy Center

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