green roof

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Denver’s Green Roof Ordinance Kicks In

A city panel will discuss changes to the new law as its impact comes into sharper focus

Posted on Jan 5 2018 by Scott Gibson

A citizen-sponsored ordinance requiring rooftop vegetation on large, newly constructed buildings in Denver took effect with the start of the new year, but a city task force already is in the works and is likely to make some changes in the months ahead.


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Image Credits:

  1. cziwkga via Flickr

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Denver Voters Approve Green Roof Initiative

Beginning in January, developers will have to include rooftop gardens on new buildings larger than 25,000 square feet

Posted on Nov 9 2017 by Scott Gibson

Neither the city's mayor nor the Chamber of Commerce liked the idea, but Denver voters on Tuesday approved a measure that will require developers of buildings larger than 25,000 square feet to include rooftop gardens in their plans.

The Denver Green RoofRoof system in which living plants are maintained in a growing medium using a membrane and drainage system. Green roofs can reduce storm-water runoff, moderate temperatures in and around the building (by providing insulation and reducing heat island effect), as well as provide a habitat for wildlife and recreational space for humans. When properly constructed, green roofs can increase roof durability because the roof assembly’s air and water barriers are buffered from temperature fluctuations and UV exposure. Initiative, appearing on the ballot as Initiated Ordinance 300, passed by a narrow margin in early returns — a little more than 4,000 votes or 4 percentage points — but the gap appeared to be holding. Backers of the grassroots effort to get the measure before voters said it looked as though they would eke out a win.


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Denver Will Vote on a Green Roof Initiative

Solar panels or garden space would be required on large buildings, but the mayor says the plan goes too far

Posted on Oct 27 2017 by Scott Gibson

A proposal facing Denver voters next month would require developers of buildings larger than 25,000 square feet to cover part of the roof with vegetation or solar panels.

In September, environmental activists narrowly won the right to place the Denver Green RoofRoof system in which living plants are maintained in a growing medium using a membrane and drainage system. Green roofs can reduce storm-water runoff, moderate temperatures in and around the building (by providing insulation and reducing heat island effect), as well as provide a habitat for wildlife and recreational space for humans. When properly constructed, green roofs can increase roof durability because the roof assembly’s air and water barriers are buffered from temperature fluctuations and UV exposure. Initiative before voters by collecting just 45 more petition signatures than they needed, The Denver Post reported.


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Image Credits:

  1. MSU Infrastructure via Flickr

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Vegetated Roofs

As California homeowners are urged to replace the grass in their yards with decorative gravel, why would anyone try to grow grass on their roof?

Posted on Apr 22 2016 by Martin Holladay
prime

Vegetated roofs are low-slope roofs the have enough soil (or soil-like growth medium) on top of the roofing to support the growth of grass, wildflowers, or shrubs. Although some people call this type of roof a “green roof,” the term “vegetated roof” is more accurate and less confusing.


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Image Credits:

  1. Image #1: Martin Holladay

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Do Green Roofs Temper Urban Heat?

Vegetated roof surfaces make compelling green PR, but how do they compare to ‘cool roofs’ in reducing the heat island effect?

Posted on Mar 14 2016 by Scott Gibson

Luke Morton sits on a green building committee that's been asked to advise local officials on a green building code. The code will feature both mandatory and elective features. One of the electives currently on the list is for a "green," or vegetated, roof, but Morton has his doubts whether the case for this type of roof is very compelling.


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Image Credits:

  1. Creative Commons license / Flickr

Solar Decathlon 2011: Team New York’s Rooftop Haven

While lots for single-family homes are scarce and expensive in New York City, rooftops are plentiful — and they make excellent places for modular homes

Posted on May 24 2011 by Richard Defendorf

Densely packed and pricey as it is, New York City usually isn’t thought of as fertile ground for single-family-home development, particularly if the goal is to keep construction costs low. And yet Team New York – a collaboration of students and faculty at the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture and the Grove School of Engineering, of the City College of New York – has found a comfortable place in the city for the single-family concept to roost: the rooftop.


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Image Credits:

  1. Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture and the Grove School of Engineering, of the City College of New York

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Lessons Learned on a Living Roof

Even drought tolerant plants need water to get established.

Posted on May 4 2009 by Ann Edminster

We have a wee living roof on our home. After a couple of false starts, it’s looking quite winsome. Since it has posed a number of challenges, I thought I’d share our experience. Mistakes, after all, are more instructive (and entertaining) than successes.

How it started
Not well, actually. I was excited about the project—not only were we going to do something new; the result, a wildflower meadow, was going to be on view from our master bedroom.


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Image Credits:

  1. A. Edminster

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