housewrap

How NOT to Install Windows in a New Home

Posted on April 25,2015 by ab3 in flashing

I see a lot of interesting stuff at construction sites and in people's homes. I also see stuff I never got to see because people send me photos. I like photos! Remember that ice chest someone had incorporated into a duct system? That was sent to me. So are the first two photos in this article.

Understanding Air Barriers, Vapor Barriers, and Drainage Planes

Posted on April 25,2015 by ab3 in air barrier

Is housewrap a vapor barrier? What's the purpose of building paper? Who'll stop the rain? I've covered this topic in various forms before, but the confusion about what the different building materials do is so widespread that I have to keep coming back to it. I'm going to keep it simple here so maybe we can get a few more people to use the proper terms, and especially to know when not to use the term “vapor barrier” ... and when not to use it.

Two New Exterior Insulation Products for Walls

Posted on April 25,2015 by user-756436 in DuPont

Exterior wall insulation? That usually means rigid foam and furring strips — although occasionally, it means mineral wool insulation and furring strips. But there are other options. Two new products offer builders new ways to keep their wall sheathing warm.

What’s New with Water-Resistive Barriers

Posted on April 25,2015 by AlexWilson in 475

I remember years ago — I hate to remember how many; it must have been around 1982 or 1983 — writing for New England Builder (now the Journal of Light Construction) about Tyvek housewrap. It was then a fairly new product — and really a new idea: a material that would wrap over the outside of a house to provide an air barrier and improve energy performance.

Does Your Air Barrier Work in Both Directions?

Posted on April 25,2015 by ab3 in air leakage

Do you want a good air barrier on your house? Of course you do. No one who knows anything at all about building science believes that old myth that a house needs to breathe. We want airtight houses, but then we want mechanical ventilation to bring in fresh air from outside (well, at least as fresh as you can get from your outside).

Walls Without Water-Resistive Barriers

Posted on April 25,2015 by ScottG in asphalt felt

Unless a builder has opted for a Zip System wall or is willing to ignore building code requirements, a layer of housewrap or building felt typically covers any exterior sheathing before the siding is applied. This water-resistive barrier, or WRB, helps to protect the sheathing from damage in the event that water is driven past the siding.

European Products for Building Tight Homes

Posted on April 25,2015 by user-756436 in air sealing

A new distributor of building products from Europe has set up shop in Brooklyn, New York. The company, called Four Seven Five, was recently founded by a trio of Passivhaus consultants: Floris Keverling Buisman, Sam McAfee, and Ken Levenson. Four Seven Five plans to import air-sealing products and ventilation fans from Germany, as well as HVAC equipment from Denmark.

Where Does the Housewrap Go?

Posted on April 25,2015 by user-756436 in drainage plane

Let’s say you’re building a house with plywood or OSB sheathing. You plan to install 2 or 4 inches of rigid foam on the exterior of the wall sheathing, followed by vertical rainscreen strapping and siding. Where does the housewrap go? Depending on who you talk to, you get two different answers:

  • It goes between the rigid foam and the vertical strapping, or
  • It goes between the sheathing and the rigid foam.

All About Water-Resistive Barriers

Posted on April 25,2015 by user-756436 in asphalt felt

UPDATED on September 18, 2013 By now, almost all builders know the importance of installing a water-resistive barrier (WRB) behind siding. Most types of siding leak, so it’s a good idea (and a code requirement) to install a WRB to protect your wall sheathing from any wind-driven rain that gets past the siding. A WRB can be vapor-permeable, like Tyvek, or vapor-impermeable, like foil-faced polyisocyanurate. As long as the wall assembly is designed to dry out when it gets wet, either vapor-permeable or vapor-impermeable WRBs work well.

Questions and Answers About Air Barriers

Posted on April 25,2015 by user-756436 in air barrier

UPDATED on December 12, 2014 Builders of a certain age — say, those older than about 55 or 60 — started their careers at a time when no one talked about air leakage or air barriers. Back in the early 1970s, even engineers were ignorant about air leakage in buildings, because the basic research hadn’t been done yet. Times have changed, and most residential building codes now require builders to include details designed to reduce air leakage. Today’s young carpenters are working on job sites where air barriers matter.

New Green Building Products — September 2010

Posted on April 25,2015 by user-756436 in can light

In this new-product roundup, I'll look at a cover for recessed can lights, a new caulk for polyethylene, and several new water-resistive barriers (WRBs) that promise better performance than Tyvek or Typar. A fire-resistant hat for recessed can lights A Delaware manufacturer named Tenmat is selling an airtight hat for recessed can lights. Tenmat light covers are made from mineral wool; according to the manufacturer, they are fire-resistant.

One Air Barrier or Two?

Posted on April 25,2015 by user-756436 in air barrier

Although building scientists have understood the advantages of airtight construction details for years, few residential plans include air barrier details. That’s nuts.

Do the blueprints show where the air barrier goes?

Ideally, construction documents should show the location of a building’s air barrier, and should explain how the builder is expected to maintain air-barrier continuity at penetrations and important intersections.

Housewrap in a Can: Liquid-Applied WRBs

Posted on April 25,2015 by user-756436 in housewrap

When it’s time to cover wall sheathing with a water-resistive barrier (WRB), most residential builders choose plastic housewrap, asphalt felt, building paper, or rigid foam sheathing. Some commercial builders, however, choose a fifth option: a liquid-applied building wrap. Liquid-applied WRBs come in a bucket and are applied to wall sheathing or concrete blocks with a roller or a spray rig. These products cure to form a tenacious, flexible coating that seals small cracks and penetrations.

Fine Home Building Making Sense of Housewraps
Register for a free account and join the conversation


Get a free account and join the conversation!
Become a GBA PRO!

Syndicate content