mastic

Can’t Anyone Get Things Right?

Posted on February 01,2015 by CarlSeville in duct

In my business of certifying buildings, most of my work involves working with architects, contractors, and trade contractors who are trying to create green buildings. Unfortunately, they frequently miss the mark in some key areas. Many of them are well intended but don’t have a broad enough view of their projects. Others only do the minimum required to meet a green building standard forced on them by someone else. And a few, thankfully, seem to get it and work hard to do the right things. This post, the first in a series about problems I run across, will focus on HVAC.

All About Furnaces and Duct Systems

Posted on February 01,2015 by user-756436 in condensing furnace

UPDATED on October 2, 2014 with more information on duct system design. Many different appliances can be used to heat a house, including boilers, water heaters, heat pumps, and wood stoves. However, most homes in the U.S. are heated by a forced-air furnace. These devices are connected to ducts that deliver heated air to registers throughout the house. Different types of furnaces are manufactured to burn a variety of fuels, including natural gas, propane, oil, and firewood. The most common furnace fuel in the U.S. is natural gas.

New Videos: Sealing Ducts and Installing Dense-Packed Cellulose

Posted on February 01,2015 by GBA Team in cellulose

GBA has released two new videos: one on installing dense-packed cellulose in stud cavities, and the other on sealing duct seams with mastic. Both videos were recorded in March 2013 at NESEA's Building Energy 13 conference in Boston.

How to Track Down Leaks in Forced-Air Ductwork

Posted on February 01,2015 by ScottG in duct

Leaky ducts in a forced-air heating and cooling system are an all-too-common problem contributing to significant energy losses and lower indoor air quality. Mark Renfrow knows that. Duct tests at his 3,400-sq. ft. home revealed “huge leakage.” A contractor addressed the problem by applying mastic to any accessible ductwork. But the key word is “accessible.” Many parts of the system apparently are not so easy to reach.

Duct Leakage Testing

Posted on February 01,2015 by user-756436 in Duct Blaster

For years, Americans who would never put up with leaky plumbing pipes have been willing to accept leaky ducts. While water damage is hard to ignore, the damage caused by leaky ducts is more subtle. Yet leaky ducts not only waste huge amounts of energy — they can also lead to comfort complaints, moisture problems, mold, and rot.

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