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Report from Day Two of GreenBuild

More news from Toronto: nuggets of wisdom from presentations and a few interesting new products

Posted on Oct 7 2011 by Martin Holladay

The crowds at the GreenBuild conference in Toronto are daunting; according to USGBCUnited States Green Building Council (USGBC). Organization devoted to promoting and certifying green buildings. USGBC created the LEED rating systems., there are 23,000 attendees this year. As an indefatigable journalist, however, I've managed to survive the crush to board the escalators and have patiently waited my turn in the long lines that form to use the rest room.

If you're interested in new products, check out my photos from the trade-show floor.

If you want to get a flavor of some of the information provided in the presentations, I've culled a few memorable quotes for you to enjoy.


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Image Credits:

  1. Martin Holladay

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GreenBuild Conference Opens in Toronto

A report from my first day attending workshops and walking the trade-show floor

Posted on Oct 5 2011 by Martin Holladay

The GreenBuild conference in Toronto, Ontario, opened its gates on October 5, 2011. This is the first time that the U.S. Green Building Council has held its annual conference outside of the United States.


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Image Credits:

  1. Martin Holladay

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New Green Building Products — March 2011

An HRV, a bath exhaust fan, a pressure-balancing grille, a sneaky video camera, and several new Passivhaus windows

Posted on Mar 25 2011 by Martin Holladay

It’s been about six months since my last roundup of new green building products. This time I’ll look at two ventilation products (an HRV(HRV). Balanced ventilation system in which most of the heat from outgoing exhaust air is transferred to incoming fresh air via an air-to-air heat exchanger; a similar device, an energy-recovery ventilator, also transfers water vapor. HRVs recover 50% to 80% of the heat in exhausted air. In hot climates, the function is reversed so that the cooler inside air reduces the temperature of the incoming hot air. and a fan), a pressure-balancing grille, and an inexpensive camera to inspect difficult-to-reach areas. I’ll also mention four new North American distributors of European PassivhausA residential building construction standard requiring very low levels of air leakage, very high levels of insulation, and windows with a very low U-factor. Developed in the early 1990s by Bo Adamson and Wolfgang Feist, the standard is now promoted by the Passivhaus Institut in Darmstadt, Germany. To meet the standard, a home must have an infiltration rate no greater than 0.60 AC/H @ 50 pascals, a maximum annual heating energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (4,755 Btu per square foot), a maximum annual cooling energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (1.39 kWh per square foot), and maximum source energy use for all purposes of 120 kWh per square meter (11.1 kWh per square foot). The standard recommends, but does not require, a maximum design heating load of 10 W per square meter and windows with a maximum U-factor of 0.14. The Passivhaus standard was developed for buildings in central and northern Europe; efforts are underway to clarify the best techniques to achieve the standard for buildings in hot climates.-certified windows.


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Image Credits:

  1. Venmar
  2. Delta Products
  3. Tamarack Technologies
  4. Energate

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New Green Building Products — January 2009

Cool new products on display in Vegas: Windows, fans, PV modules, and ICFs

Posted on Jan 21 2009 by Martin Holladay

LAS VEGAS, NV — Wandering the trade show floor at the International Builders' Show in Las Vegas today, I stumbled upon several intriguing new products. Here are four of them.

Serious Energy windows

Serious Energy, a window manufacturer that recently acquired Alpen Windows, has made several improvements to Alpen’s line of windows with pultruded fiberglass frames. Windows from Serious Energy (formerly known as Serious Materials) are available with Heat Mirror glazingWhen referring to windows or doors, the transparent or translucent layer that transmits light. High-performance glazing may include multiple layers of glass or plastic, low-e coatings, and low-conductivity gas fill. from Southwall Technologies.


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Image Credits:

  1. Martin Holladay

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