panelized construction

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High-Performance Builders See Gains Ahead with Panelized Construction

Two companies are expanding their production capabilities with an eye toward growth

Posted on Jun 30 2017 by Scott Gibson

Two New England design/build firms are increasing their commitment to high-end panelized designs, betting that homebuyers will be increasingly interested in well-executed, energy-efficient homes at less than custom prices.

Maine-based GO Logic, known for high-performance houses in a contemporary New England architectural style, has launched a line of panelized houses called GO Home, along with a new website that makes it easier for buyers to pick layouts, finishes, and features.


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Image Credits:

  1. Image #1: Josh Gerritsen
  2. Image #2: Unity Homes
  3. Image #3: Bensonwood
  4. Image #4: Joshn Gerritsen

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Robotics Comes to Homebuilding

A Baltimore company is pioneering the use of industrial robots to build single-family homes

Posted on Apr 21 2017 by Scott Gibson

Fast, precise and uncomplaining, industrial robots revolutionized the automotive industry with production lines that rarely needed a break and mechanical employees who never filed an insurance claim. Now, a group of Baltimore-based entrepreneurs is betting the same approach can work wonders for the U.S. housing market.


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Image Credits:

  1. Spencer Cooper / CC BY-ND 2.0 / Flickr

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Prefab Passive House Partnership Hits a Milestone

A house is assembled in New York from panels manufactured in Maine, while Phoenix Haus in Detroit moves into high gear

Posted on Mar 20 2017 by Scott Gibson

It took four carpenters and six crane days to assemble Elizabeth Scott's new house in Altamont, New York, and when they were finished the partnership of Ecocor and architect Richard Pedranti had reached an important goal for their new line of "Solsken" Passive HouseA residential building construction standard requiring very low levels of air leakage, very high levels of insulation, and windows with a very low U-factor. Developed in the early 1990s by Bo Adamson and Wolfgang Feist, the standard is now promoted by the Passivhaus Institut in Darmstadt, Germany. To meet the standard, a home must have an infiltration rate no greater than 0.60 AC/H @ 50 pascals, a maximum annual heating energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (4,755 Btu per square foot), a maximum annual cooling energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (1.39 kWh per square foot), and maximum source energy use for all purposes of 120 kWh per square meter (11.1 kWh per square foot). The standard recommends, but does not require, a maximum design heating load of 10 W per square meter and windows with a maximum U-factor of 0.14. The Passivhaus standard was developed for buildings in central and northern Europe; efforts are underway to clarify the best techniques to achieve the standard for buildings in hot climates. prefabs.


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Image Credits:

  1. Ecocor

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Can This Panelized System Solve Your Enclosure Problems?

The Build Smart system makes it easy to control heat, air, and water

Posted on Dec 14 2016 by Allison A. Bailes III, PhD
prime

If you want to build a superinsulated, airtight house, you run into some difficulties. How do you deal with the extra thickness of your walls and ceilings when you add all that extra insulation? What's the best way to ensure you hit your airtightness goal? And how do you do all that while keeping the process manageable and the cost affordable?

The new Build SMART panelized system has some answers.


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Image Credits:

  1. Energy Vanguard

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Factories Gear Up for Passive House Building

Plants on both sides of North America specialize in superinsulated panelized building components

Posted on Jun 20 2016 by Scott Gibson

Factories designed to turn out prefabricated components for Passive HouseA residential building construction standard requiring very low levels of air leakage, very high levels of insulation, and windows with a very low U-factor. Developed in the early 1990s by Bo Adamson and Wolfgang Feist, the standard is now promoted by the Passivhaus Institut in Darmstadt, Germany. To meet the standard, a home must have an infiltration rate no greater than 0.60 AC/H @ 50 pascals, a maximum annual heating energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (4,755 Btu per square foot), a maximum annual cooling energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (1.39 kWh per square foot), and maximum source energy use for all purposes of 120 kWh per square meter (11.1 kWh per square foot). The standard recommends, but does not require, a maximum design heating load of 10 W per square meter and windows with a maximum U-factor of 0.14. The Passivhaus standard was developed for buildings in central and northern Europe; efforts are underway to clarify the best techniques to achieve the standard for buildings in hot climates. buildings are up and running on both sides of North America.

In Pemberton, British Columbia, a company called BC Passive House operates the BC Passive House Factory, a 16,146-square-foot production facility that makes panelized parts for Passive House buildings as well as panels for timber-frame buildings.

Vancouver-based Hemsworth Architecture, which designed the building, says it is the first of its kind in North America.


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Image Credits:

  1. Ema Peter Photography
  2. RPA

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What’s Different About Unity Homes?

Panelized construction, meticulous attention to energy detailing, and a sophisticated computer design system put Unity Homes at the cutting edge of home building

Posted on May 2 2013 by Alex Wilson

In my blog last week, I provided a little background on Tedd Benson and his evolution that ledLight-emitting diode. Illumination technology that produces light by running electrical current through a semiconductor diode. LED lamps are much longer lasting and much more energy efficient than incandescent lamps; unlike fluorescent lamps, LED lamps do not contain mercury and can be readily dimmed. him to found Unity Homes. This week, I’ll describe some of the features that set Unity Homes apart from both standard home construction and other panelized and manufactured home production.


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Image Credits:

  1. Alex Wilson
  2. Unity Homes
  3. Tedd Benson
  4. Bensonwood

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