passive house

Passivhaus Institut Rewrites Certification Standards

Posted on April 19,2015 by ScottG in net-zero energy

Germany's Passivhaus Institut has created two new levels of compliance for certification that for the first time set minimums for renewable energy production as well as new limits on how much energy a building can consume. The changes are rolled into a new version of the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP), the modeling software that designers use in designing Passivhaus structures, and will go into effect with its release later in April.

Blogs Prime Article Passive House Perfection

Radon and a Passive House

Posted on April 19,2015 by phonig in passive house

Let me start out by stating that I am neither a radon expert nor a Passive House expert. That said, I do have experience with radon gas in a Passive House that I'd like to share.

Interior Paint and a Back Porch for the Potwine Passivhaus

Posted on April 19,2015 by acarango@me.com in Amherst

As they set out to build a single-family Passivhaus on Potwine Lane in Amherst, Massachusetts, Alexi Arango and LeeAnn Kim asked themselves, “Is it possible to live without burning fossil fuels?” One measure of success would be meeting their goal of net-zero energy performance. This is the twelfth blog in a series.

The Potwine Passivhaus Gets Insulation and Drywall

Posted on April 19,2015 by acarango@me.com in Amherst

As they set out to build a single-family Passivhaus on Potwine Lane in Amherst, Massachusetts, Alexi Arango and LeeAnn Kim asked themselves, “Is it possible to live without burning fossil fuels?” One measure of success would be meeting their goal of net-zero energy performance. This is the eleventh blog in a series.

Passive House is Looking for a Few Good Men (and Women)

Posted on April 19,2015 by CarlSeville in certification

I make no claim to being an expert on Passive House, but ignorance has never stopped me from expressing my opinion before. Among the major complaints about the Passive House standard is that it has inflexible energy use requirements, and the European-designed program does not effectively address the wide range of U.S. climate zones. This inflexibility often leads those who pursue this certification to install enormous quantities of insulation, particularly under slabs, which raises a variety of questions and concerns about the usefulness of this practice.

Tilt/Turn Windows Are Fabulous

Posted on April 19,2015 by acarango@me.com in Amherst

As they set out to build a single-family Passivhaus on Potwine Lane in Amherst, Massachusetts, Alexi Arango and LeeAnn Kim asked themselves, “Is it possible to live without burning fossil fuels?” One measure of success would be meeting their goal of net-zero energy performance. This is the tenth blog in a series.

Passivhaus Hits a Big Milestone

Posted on April 19,2015 by ScottG in certification

At least symbolically, it was a refurbished Craftsman bungalow in Santa Cruz, California, that helped nudge the total of certified floor area meeting the Passivhaus standard beyond the 1 million square meter mark, the German-based Passivhaus Institut said.

A Heat-Recovery Ventilation System for the Potwine Passivhaus

Posted on April 19,2015 by acarango@me.com in Amherst

As they set out to build a single-family Passivhaus on Potwine Lane in Amherst, Massachusetts, Alexi Arango and LeeAnn Kim asked themselves, “Is it possible to live without burning fossil fuels?” One measure of success would be meeting their goal of net-zero energy performance. This is the ninth blog in a series.

In Maine, A Passivhaus School Takes Shape

Posted on April 19,2015 by ScottG in Friends School

For now, you'll have to use your imagination to envision a new school on the wooded site a few miles north of Portland, Maine. There are only concrete stem walls outlining the shape of the building, and earth-moving equipment up in back shaping what will eventually become recreation fields. But by next June, visitors should be able to see the new Friends School of Portland. The 15,000-square-foot building will be one of only a few Passivhaus school buildings in the country, and the largest Passivhaus structure in Maine. Architects also plan on making it a net-zero energy building.

Connecting to the Grid Can Be Expensive

Posted on April 19,2015 by acarango@me.com in Amherst

As they set out to build a single-family Passivhaus on Potwine Lane in Amherst, Massachusetts, Alexi Arango and LeeAnn Kim asked themselves, “Is it possible to live without burning fossil fuels?” One measure of success would be meeting their goal of net-zero energy performance. This is the eighth blog in a series.

The Largest Passivhaus Building in the U.S.

Posted on April 19,2015 by blueworker in affordable housing

In Portland’s western suburbs, a structure is on the rise that could change the face of affordable housing in America. Situated adjacent to the Orenco Station light rail transit stop in Hillsboro, Oregon, the Orchards at Orenco will provide 57 units of housing. The project sponsor, REACH Community Development, is aiming to achieve Passivhaus certification. When complete in the spring of 2015, Orchards at Orenco is slated to be the largest Passivhaus-certified building in North America.

Passivhaus Open House Tours

Posted on April 19,2015 by ScottG in passive house

If you're interested in seeing what a house built to the Passivhaus standard looks like, your opportunity is coming right up. November 7-9 marks the annual International Passivhaus Days in which hundreds of houses in many countries will be open for tour. There are a couple of ways of searching for nearby Passivhaus homes that are part of the tour. One of them is by visiting the Passivhaus Database maintained by the Passivhaus Institut in Germany.

Roof Sheathing and Window Bucks for the Potwine Passivhaus

Posted on April 19,2015 by acarango@me.com in Amherst

As they set out to build a single-family Passivhaus on Potwine Lane in Amherst, Massachusetts, Alexi Arango and LeeAnn Kim asked themselves, “Is it possible to live without burning fossil fuels?” One measure of success would be meeting their goal of net-zero energy performance. This is the seventh blog in a series.

Setting Roof Trusses at the Potwine Passivhaus

Posted on April 19,2015 by acarango@me.com in Amherst

As they set out to build a single-family Passivhaus on Potwine Lane in Amherst, Massachusetts, Alexi Arango and LeeAnn Kim asked themselves, “Is it possible to live without burning fossil fuels?” One measure of success would be meeting their goal of net-zero energy performance. This is the sixth blog in a series.

A Tale of Two Houses

Posted on April 19,2015 by ScottG in Michler

As difficult as it is to meet the requirements for Passivhaus certification, builders and designers have a great deal of leeway in how they approach it. There are just a few big hurdles to clear, including limits on how much energy the building can use and how airtight the building envelope must be. Exactly how a builder accomplishes this is not spelled out. As long as the building meets the standard, it can win certification, either from the Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS) or its European counterpart, the Passivhaus Institut (PHI).

Living in a Passivhaus

Posted on April 19,2015 by user-1127165 in Falmouth

[Editor's note: Daniel Roy is one of the owners of a recently completed Passivhaus in Falmouth, Massachusetts. Designed by architect Steve Baczek, the house was featured in a series of GBA videos. For more information on the home's energy specifications, see the attached Excel spreadsheet.]

Attaching SIPs to Structural 2×6 Studs

Posted on April 19,2015 by acarango@me.com in Amherst

As they set out to build a single-family Passivhaus on Potwine Lane in Amherst, Massachusetts, Alexi Arango and LeeAnn Kim asked themselves, “Is it possible to live without burning fossil fuels?” One measure of success would be meeting their goal of net-zero energy performance. This is the fifth blog in a planned series.

Part 5 of GBA’s Passivhaus Video Series

Posted on April 19,2015 by GBA Team in Baczek

At the Passivhaus job site in Falmouth, Massachusetts, architect Steve Baczek specified triple-glazed Makrowin windows from Slovakia. The windows were installed as "in-betweenies," and the perimeter of each window was sealed with Siga Wigluv tape. To make sure that the installations were watertight, each window was tested with a garden hose equipped with a spray nozzle after it was installed.

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