Passivhaus window

Comparing North American Window Frames to European Frames

Posted on January 31,2015 by Stephen Thwaites in certified window

[Editor's note: The author of this article, Stephen Thwaites, is a window manufacturer. His company, Thermotech Fiberglass Fenestration, is located in Ottawa, Ontario.]

PHIUS Posts Window Data

Posted on January 31,2015 by ScottG in glazing

Passive House Institute U.S. has posted detailed performance data about windows online for ready access by builders and designers. The Certified Data for Windows program is organized by manufacturer, and includes key values such as the window's solar heat gain coefficient, its center-of-glass U-factor, and its whole-window installed U-factor.

Intus Introduces a Wood-Framed Window

Posted on January 31,2015 by ScottG in Intus

Intus has introduced a new triple-glazed window, the Premier 78 Alu Mira Advanced, which combines a pine frame, high-density foam, and exterior aluminum cladding. Intus says the windows, which are manufactured in Lithuania with lumber from Germany and Austria, are suitable for Passivhaus construction. The argon-filled glazing has a U-value of 0.088, and when combined with the frame has a U-value of 0.14, the equivalent of about R-7.

More Windows Win Passive House Certification

Posted on January 31,2015 by ScottG in Passivhaus window

Builders hoping to meet the Passivhaus energy efficiency standard can now choose between five window manufacturers in North American, four in the U.S. and one in Canada. Three of the manufacturers have had windows certified by the Passivhaus Institut (PHI) in Germany, the other two by the rival U.S. organization, Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS).

Marvin to Offer Passivhaus Windows

Posted on January 31,2015 by ScottG in certified window

Minnesota-based Marvin Windows and Doors expects to win certification shortly for a line of high-performance windows from both the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) and the Passivhaus Institut in Europe, allowing builders here to cut lead times for certified windows to as little as six weeks.

Do Europeans Make Better Windows Than We Do?

Posted on January 31,2015 by ScottG in Passivhaus window

It should come as no surprise that Europe, home of the Passivhaus standard, produces some outstanding windows. Some builders of high-efficiency houses in North America turn to European window manufacturers for their glazing, even though some U.S. and Canadian producers also offer high-performance products of their own. Is there a way to compare the performance data on windows from these two sources? That’s what Steve Young, now planning a Passive House in Climate Zone 5, would like to know.

Looking Through Windows — Part 7

Posted on January 31,2015 by user-961160 in Bieber

[Editor's note: Roger and Lynn Normand are building a [no-glossary]Passivhaus[/no-glossary] in Maine. This is the 11th article in a series that will follow their project from planning through construction.] There’s a popular saying here in Maine — “we’re all set” — to signify that the current situation is perfectly fine. Window selection had so far been the most time-consuming and vexing aspect of the EdgewaterHaus project. That was all behind us. We had made a final decision on an Optiwin-designed Bieber-manufactured Passivhaus-certified windows.

Looking Through Windows — Part 6

Posted on January 31,2015 by user-961160 in Bieber

[Editor's note: Roger and Lynn Normand are building a [no-glossary]Passivhaus[/no-glossary] in Maine. This is the tenth article in a series that will follow their project from planning through construction.] Enough suspense on windows. It’s a Bieber! And yes, that’s our final decision. We’ve made a sizable cash deposit and started precise shop drawings for the windows.

Looking Through Windows — Part 5

Posted on January 31,2015 by user-961160 in passive house

[Editor's note: Roger and Lynn Normand are building a [no-glossary]Passivhaus[/no-glossary] in Maine. This is the ninth article in a series that will follow their project from planning through construction.] Strike up the band: we have – finally – achieved the Passivhaus standard with Unilux windows! Marc Rosenbaum, our energy consultant, ran the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) energy modeling software and arrived at a heat load of 4.74 KBTU/sq. ft./year, a mere 0.01 below the 4.75 limit. Talk about a photo-finish squeaker!

Looking Through Windows — Part 4

Posted on January 31,2015 by user-961160 in passive house

[Editor's note: Roger and Lynn Normand are building a [no-glossary]Passivhaus[/no-glossary] in Maine. This is the eighth article in a series that will follow their project from planning through construction.] We have been comparing two window options for EdgewaterHaus: German-manufactured Unilux windows, and Canadian-made windows from Thermotech Fiberglass. I’ll talk about Thermotech in this blog; a previous blog discussed our impressions of the Unilux windows.

Looking Through Windows — Part 3

Posted on January 31,2015 by user-961160 in Passivhaus

[Editor's note: Roger and Lynn Normand are building a [no-glossary]Passivhaus[/no-glossary] in Maine. This is the seventh article in a series that will follow their project from planning through construction.] Woe are we with windows! We started seriously exploring window options in June. Two months later, we are STILL hung-up on windows. Most people who build new homes go look at window samples in few building supply stores, check the features, open and close the display units, get a price, and quickly decide, “Let’s go with this one.”

Looking Through Windows — Part 2

Posted on January 31,2015 by user-961160 in Passivhaus window

[Editor's note: Roger and Lynn Normand are building a [no-glossary]Passivhaus[/no-glossary] in Maine. This is the sixth article in a series that will follow their project from planning through construction.]

New Green Building Products — September 2011

Posted on January 31,2015 by user-756436 in door

About every six months, I report on new products that catch my eye. This round-up features products from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean: high-performance windows from Maine, Ontario, and Lithuania; high-performance doors from Poland; and high-performance tapes from Switzerland.

Folding Glass for Passivhaus Projects

Posted on January 31,2015 by Fretboard in passive house

NanaWall Systems is a veteran in the folding-glass-wall business. Launched in 1986, the company significantly expanded its lineup after 1996, when it forged a partnership with Solarlux Technologies, based in Bissendorf, Germany.

Passivhaus Windows

Posted on January 31,2015 by user-756436 in certified window

UPDATED on June 11, 2013 with new information on European Passivhaus-certified windows available in the U.S. German windows, like German cars, have a very solid reputation for high performance and durability. U.S. interest in German windows has grown in recent years, especially among Passivhaus builders, leading several U.S. importers to conclude that the time is ripe to offer German windows to North American customers.

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