pier foundation

QA-spotlightheader image

A One-Room Insulation Challenge

This poorly insulated addition has a pier foundation and is open to the wind from below

Posted on Jan 22 2018 by Scott Gibson

The one-room addition on Emerson W's home is not what anyone would realistically consider over-insulated: R-11 batts in the walls and R-19 at most in the ceiling. But the immediate issue is the floor. There's no insulation at all there, and because the addition sits on concrete piers, there's nothing to stop the wind from blowing freely below.


Tags: , , , , ,

Image Credits:

  1. Image #1: Emerson W
  2. Images #2, #3, and #4: Peter Yost

musingsheader image

Crawl Spaces vs. Skirts

If you have a house on piers, should you enclose the space under the house or leave it open?

Posted on Jul 21 2017 by Martin Holladay
prime

Many older homes in rural areas have pier foundations. The piers may be made of wood (for example, creosoted posts or pressure-treated lumber), poured concrete, CMUs, or bricks. The space between the dirt and the underside of the floor framing may be enclosed or may be entirely open to the wind.


Tags: , , , , ,

Image Credits:

  1. LanaiLens

QA-spotlightheader image

Insulating an Exposed Floor

Why are there signs of condensation in the insulated joist bays of this house on piers?

Posted on Apr 8 2013 by Scott Gibson

A GBAGreenBuildingAdvisor.com reader who calls himself “Mr. Mike” is working on an 11-ft. by 14-ft. addition to his house in central New York that sits some 5 feet off the ground. The space beneath the addition is a great place to park a lawnmower, but it's also open to the cold.


Tags: , , , ,

Image Credits:

  1. Mr. Mike

Register for a free account and join the conversation


Get a free account and join the conversation!
Become a GBA PRO!

Syndicate content