Prefabricated houses

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Passive House Building in the Digital Age

A Maine factory begins production of components for panelized Passive House buildings

Posted on Aug 31 2016 by Scott Gibson

The first components for prefabricated Passive HouseA residential building construction standard requiring very low levels of air leakage, very high levels of insulation, and windows with a very low U-factor. Developed in the early 1990s by Bo Adamson and Wolfgang Feist, the standard is now promoted by the Passivhaus Institut in Darmstadt, Germany. To meet the standard, a home must have an infiltration rate no greater than 0.60 AC/H @ 50 pascals, a maximum annual heating energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (4,755 Btu per square foot), a maximum annual cooling energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (1.39 kWh per square foot), and maximum source energy use for all purposes of 120 kWh per square meter (11.1 kWh per square foot). The standard recommends, but does not require, a maximum design heating load of 10 W per square meter and windows with a maximum U-factor of 0.14. The Passivhaus standard was developed for buildings in central and northern Europe; efforts are underway to clarify the best techniques to achieve the standard for buildings in hot climates. homes are now rolling out the door of a small factory in Searsmont, Maine, where house building is sailing into the digital age.

RPA-Ecocor, the joint venture between Ecocor’s Christian Corson and architect Richard Pedranti, launched in June 2016 with 11 model home designs. It’s now producing wall sections for a Passive House that will be erected in the Albany, New York, area later this year.


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Image Credits:

  1. Scott Gibson

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Coming in From the Cold

What happens if we bring the Northeast’s craftsmen inside to work?

Posted on Mar 24 2015 by Phil Kaplan

In the Northeast, there is a proud history of the craftsman, the homebuilder, the DIY hero and heroine. They work with sturdy tools, with local materials, with real wood. They brave the mean winters, cut each stick with caution, are frugal with lumber. They measure twice, and cut once. They have done this the same way over many years and the product is consistent, steady, exactly the same as it would have been, had it been built in 1953.

There’s only one problem. We live in a very different world than we did in 1953.


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Image Credits:

  1. Trent Bell
  2. Phil Kaplan

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