recessed can

Rethinking Recessed Lighting

Posted on March 01,2015 by DebSilber in downlighting

Recessed can lights have gained a reputation as the go-to fixture for inexpensive downlighting. But they have their drawbacks. When placed in an upper ceiling and not sealed and insulated, they can bleed energy. When improperly insulated, they can present a fire hazard.

Banish These Details From Your Plans

Posted on March 01,2015 by user-756436 in bay window

Is it possible to disassemble old shipping pallets and glue the pieces of lumber together to make furniture? Of course it’s possible; some woodworkers have used this method to make beautiful tables and chairs. There’s a fly in the ointment, however: while it’s possible, it’s not very easy. Many commonly used construction methods, design details, and materials fall into a category I would call “possible but not easy.” I decided to create a list of items that fall into this category.

New Green Building Products — May 2014

Posted on March 01,2015 by user-756436 in 475 Building Products

It’s time once again to take a look at a few interesting new building products. I recently spotted two potentially useful ventilation products — a new type of ERV and a fan for ventilating small rooms — and two products that are destined for attics — an insulating “hat” for recessed cans and a ventilation baffle that can be installed between rafters. I will also report on JointSealR, a tape distributed by Owens Corning for taping XPS seams.

Ban the Can

Posted on March 01,2015 by user-1048334 in air leakage

One hates to overstate how problematic recessed lights can be, but… they sure are a pain in the energy-auditor butt. There are worse problems (wet basements), more expensive ones (insulating a complicated roof line), and more frustrating ones (the cross-purposes of energy evaluations and homeowner desires). But few elements of the house combine all three in as tidy a package as recessed light cans.

New Green Building Products — September 2010

Posted on March 01,2015 by user-756436 in can light

In this new-product roundup, I'll look at a cover for recessed can lights, a new caulk for polyethylene, and several new water-resistive barriers (WRBs) that promise better performance than Tyvek or Typar. A fire-resistant hat for recessed can lights A Delaware manufacturer named Tenmat is selling an airtight hat for recessed can lights. Tenmat light covers are made from mineral wool; according to the manufacturer, they are fire-resistant.

Register for a free account and join the conversation


Get a free account and join the conversation!
Become a GBA PRO!

Syndicate content