rock wool

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Mineral Wool Makers Dropping Formaldehyde Binders

Two manufacturers will begin making insulation with ‘no added formaldehyde’ later this year

Posted on May 4 2017 by Scott Gibson

Two manufacturers of mineral wool insulation have announced that they will stop using binders containing formaldehydeChemical found in many building products; most binders used for manufactured wood products are formaldehyde compounds. Reclassified by the United Nations International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in 2004 as a “known human carcinogen." in at least some of their products, a move aimed at addressing long-standing health concerns and meeting tougher green certification requirements.


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Image Credits:

  1. Roxul

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Sub-Slab Mineral Wool

Some builders have begun installing a continuous horizontal layer of mineral wool insulation under concrete slabs

Posted on May 22 2015 by Martin Holladay
prime

UPDATED on April 5, 2016


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Image Credits:

  1. Image #1 and #2: Michael Hindle
  2. Image #3, #4, and #5: EcoHome
  3. Image #6: Roxul
  4. Image #7: Brennan + Company Architects

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Mineral Wool Insulation Isn’t Like Fiberglass

What you don’t know about mineral wool insulation will make you look stupid

Posted on Apr 8 2014 by Gregory La Vardera

If you are interested in green building, or call yourself a green building expert, then you should know about mineral wool insulation. If you have not seen mineral wool handled and installed, then you need to read this.

If you think that mineral wool batts are similar enough to fiberglass batts that you already know what you need to know about it, then you are a fool. And you still need to read this.


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Image Credits:

  1. Smålandsvillan
  2. RepCon NW
  3. Randek AB

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Better National Distribution for Mineral Wool Batts

After Owens Corning purchased Thermafiber, Menards agrees to distribute Thermafiber UltraBatts

Posted on Nov 7 2013 by Alex Wilson

Back in May of this year I wrote about a new rigid mineral wool insulation product from Roxul and how it can be used in place of foam-plastic insulation materials like polystyrene in certain applications. I've been revising the BuildingGreen Guide to Insulation Products and Practices and dug back into lots of insulation products. There are some new mineral wool developments to report.

Before getting into the details, here’s a little background: Mineral wool, variously referred to as rock wool, slag wool, and stone wool, was one of the first insulation materials to be widely produced commercially — starting back in 1871 in Germany.


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Image Credits:

  1. Thermafiber

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Owens Corning Buys Mineral Wool Manufacturer

By purchasing Thermafiber, Owens Corning has expanded its portfolio of insulation products

Posted on Jun 25 2013 by Scott Gibson

Owens Corning is going into the mineral wool insulation business.

The Toledo, Ohio, company has purchased Thermafiber Inc., a manufacturer of mineral wool insulation for residential, commercial, and industrial markets.

Owens Corning already makes a variety of insulation products, including its familiar pink fiberglass batts, blown-in fiberglass, extruded polystyrene, and duct liner and duct board.

Thermafiber has a single 145,000-sq. ft. plant in Wabash, Indiana, with about 150 employees. Owens Corning would not say how much insulation the plant currently produces.


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Image Credits:

  1. Owens Corning

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Mineral Wool Boardstock Insulation Gains Ground

Roxul ComfortBoard IS has some important environmental and performance advantages over XPS and polyisocyanurate insulation

Posted on May 16 2013 by Alex Wilson

Readers of this Energy Solutions blog may be aware that I’ve been critical of some of our foam-plastic insulation materials. I’ve come down hardest on extruded polystyrene (XPSExtruded polystyrene. Highly insulating, water-resistant rigid foam insulation that is widely used above and below grade, such as on exterior walls and underneath concrete floor slabs. In North America, XPS is made with ozone-depleting HCFC-142b. XPS has higher density and R-value and lower vapor permeability than EPS rigid insulation.), which is made both with a blowing agent that contributes significantly to global warming and with a brominated flame retardant, HBCD, that’s slated for international phaseout as a persistent organic pollutant.


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Image Credits:

  1. Roxul
  2. Residential installation of ComfortBoard IS.

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Wrapping an Older House with Rock Wool Insulation

The designer of a deep energy retrofit project in Massachusetts specified 6 inches of mineral wool insulation for the exterior side of the walls

Posted on May 14 2013 by Mark Yanowitz

When I first met Chris Gleba and Kris Erickson in December 2011 to discuss their plans for a deep energy retrofit, Chris told me that he had been remodeling his modest two-bedroom house in Lowell, Massachusetts, for over ten years. He had painstakingly rewired and re-plumbed the house and had made energy efficiency improvements (including the installation of a high-efficiency natural gas boiler and radiant in-floor heating). He had also devoted much sweat equity towards upgrading the interior finishes of the kitchen and baths.


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Image Credits:

  1. All photos: Mark Yanowitz
  2. Heco-Topix
  3. Architectural drawings: Verdeco Designs

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Installing Mineral Wool Insulation Over Exterior Wall Sheathing

Researchers confirm that Roxul panels and furring strips can be installed on walls as a substitute for exterior rigid foam

Posted on Aug 26 2011 by Martin Holladay

A subset of green builders have always been grumpy about foam. Such builders look at rigid foam panels and spray foam as suspect products: they are made from petroleum, laced with mysterious chemicals, and impermeable to vapor flow.


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Image Credits:

  1. Building Science Corporation

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