tape

A Review of Siga Wigluv Air-Sealing Tape

Posted on March 28,2015 by Matt Risinger in air barrier

Every house needs four control layers. In order of importance, these layers need to provide:

  1. 1. Water control
  2. 2. Air control
  3. 3. Vapor control
  4. 4. Thermal control
The building codes have dictated the levels of thermal control and vapor control that builders must adhere to, and nearly every builder in the U.S. knows off the top of their head the R-value of the insulation in their walls and attics.

Return to the Backyard Tape Test

Posted on March 28,2015 by user-756436 in air-sealing tape

In the fall of 2012, I tested the performance of 11 air-sealing tapes by attaching samples to six different substrates mounted on the exterior wall of my woodshed. A month later, I tried to remove the tape samples to determine which tapes were most tenacious. I reported my findings in the April/May 2013 issue of Fine Homebuilding. (The details of the test set-up can be found in that article, “Backyard Tape Test.”)

Getting the Biggest Bang for Your Air-Sealing Buck

Posted on March 28,2015 by user-756436 in air leakage

Most new homes are leaky. In the typical new home, significant volumes of air enter through cracks near the basement rim joists and exit through ceiling holes on the building’s top floor. These air leaks waste tremendous amount of energy.

What Makes the ‘Best’ Air Barrier?

Posted on March 28,2015 by ScottG in air sealing

Bill L. is planning a high-performance house in Massachusetts and is wrestling with options for the air barrier, that all-important building detail that enhances both energy efficiency and building durability. Above-grade walls will consist of a 2x4 structural frame sheathed in 1/2-inch plywood, followed by I-joists packed with cellulose insulation, another layer of 1/2-inch plywood, a corrugated plastic product to provide an air space, and fiber-cement siding. The primary air-barrier plane will be at the plywood over the 2x4 studs.

Fine Home Building Backyard Tape Test

European Products for Building Tight Homes

Posted on March 28,2015 by user-756436 in air sealing

A new distributor of building products from Europe has set up shop in Brooklyn, New York. The company, called Four Seven Five, was recently founded by a trio of Passivhaus consultants: Floris Keverling Buisman, Sam McAfee, and Ken Levenson. Four Seven Five plans to import air-sealing products and ventilation fans from Germany, as well as HVAC equipment from Denmark.

New Green Building Products — September 2011

Posted on March 28,2015 by user-756436 in door

About every six months, I report on new products that catch my eye. This round-up features products from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean: high-performance windows from Maine, Ontario, and Lithuania; high-performance doors from Poland; and high-performance tapes from Switzerland.

Air-Sealing Tapes and Gaskets

Posted on March 28,2015 by user-756436 in air leakage

UPDATED March 8, 2013 After this article was published, Martin Holladay conducted a test of eleven air-sealing tapes on a variety of materials. To read the results of Holladay's testing, see Backyard Tape Test and Return to the Backyard Tape Test.

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