ventilation

guest-blogsheader image

Integrating HRVs With Air Handlers

In homes with forced-air heating, the heating ducts can also be used for heat-recovery ventilation

Posted on Feb 12 2018 by Bruce Sullivan

This is the second of two articles about heat-recovery and energy-recovery ventilators based on training developed by Bruce Manclark and Dan Wildenhaus of CLEAResult. Part 1, which covers equipment selection, is available here. This post originally appeared at the Zero Energy Project.


Tags: , ,

Image Credits:

  1. Zero Energy Project

guest-blogsheader image

Six Steps to Success With Heat-Recovery Ventilation

Whole-house ventilation is one of the cornerstones of a high-performance house

Posted on Jan 29 2018 by Bruce Sullivan

Heat-recovery ventilators (HRVs) and energy-recovery ventilators (ERVs) remove stale air from the home and replace it (in winter) with preheated fresh air from outside. The result is better indoor air quality and lower energy use than in standard homes. The HRV itself is fairly simple: an airtight box with a heat exchange core that transfers heat from the indoor air to outside air (or vice-versa) as the air passes through the box. The box also contains two small fans to move the air. All the points below apply equally to HRVs and their close cousins, energy-recovery ventilators (ERVs).


Tags: , , , , ,

Image Credits:

  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

building-scienceheader image

Adjusting Bath Fan Use in Winter

Do you really need to run it when you shower?

Posted on Jan 24 2018 by Allison A. Bailes III, PhD
prime

You may have heard or read somewhere that you should run your bathroom exhaust fan whenever you take a shower and then let it run for a while after you're done with the shower. Showers increase the humidity in the bathroom. Sometimes it gets high enough to cause condensation to appear on the mirror and other surfaces in the bathroom. And that can result in mold growth.

So you should always run your bath fan when you shower. Or so they say.


Tags: , , , , ,

Image Credits:

  1. Energy Vanguard

building-scienceheader image

Ventilating a Home in Cold Weather

You need fresh air, but bringing in cold outdoor air can cause problems

Posted on Jan 10 2018 by Allison A. Bailes III, PhD
prime

When I woke up Saturday morning, the temperature outdoors was -40 degrees. The wind chill was -100 degrees! It was just unbelievably, impossibly, inhumanly cold outside. Fortunately, that was on a mountaintop in New Hampshire and not where I was. I happened to have woken up on a mountaintop in North Carolina, where the temperature was a much warmer -3°F.


Tags: , , , , , , ,

Image Credits:

  1. Energy Vanguard

musingsheader image

Revisiting Ventilation

An updated overview of residential ventilation systems

Posted on Nov 17 2017 by Martin Holladay
prime

My comprehensive article on residential ventilation systems, “Designing a Good Ventilation System,” was published back in 2009. A few things have changed in the last eight years, so it’s time to revisit the topic.


Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Image Credits:

  1. Lunos and Soler & Palau

green-building-blogheader image

GBA Prime Sneak Peek: Bathroom Design

Principles to keep in mind when designing your next bathroom

Posted on Sep 22 2017 by Martin Holladay

GBAGreenBuildingAdvisor.com Prime subscribers have access to many articles that aren't accessible to non-subscribers, including Martin Holladay's weekly blog series, “Musings of an Energy Nerd.” To whet the appetite of non-subscribers, we occasionally offer non-subscribers access to a “GBA Prime Sneak Peek” article like this one.


Tags: , , , ,

Image Credits:

  1. Image #2: Ann Edminster - San Joaquin County Habitat for Humanity

musingsheader image

Bathroom Design

Principles to keep in mind when designing your next bathroom

Posted on Sep 22 2017 by Martin Holladay
prime

Americans who grew up in the 1950s or early 60s (that includes me) remember living in a house with one bathroom. There was usually someone standing outside the door yelling, “Hurry up!”

These days, most Americans live in (or aspire to live in) a house with two or more bathrooms. My guess is that we’re never going to return to the bathroom standards of the 1950s; two-bathroom houses are probably here to stay.


Tags: , , , ,

Image Credits:

  1. Image #2: Ann Edminster - San Joaquin County Habitat for Humanity

musingsheader image

All About Earth Tubes

Buried ventilation ducts can provide benefits — as long as you avoid a long list of possible pitfalls

Posted on May 12 2017 by Martin Holladay
prime

An earth tubeVentilation air intake tube, usually measuring 8 or more inches in diameter and buried 5 or more feet below grade. Earth tubes take advantage of relatively constant subterranean temperatures to pre-heat air in winter and pre-cool it in summer. In humid climates, some earth tubes develop significant amounts of condensation during the summer, potentially contributing to indoor air quality problems. is a buried ventilation duct. The idea behind burying ventilation ducts — the ducts conveying fresh outdoor air to a building — is that the soil surrounding the ducts will warm the ventilation air during the winter and cool the ventilation air during the summer.

Earth tubes can work, as long as:

  • the duct is installed in a climate with useful soil temperatures,
  • the duct has a large enough diameter,
  • the duct is long enough,
  • the duct is buried deep enough,

Tags: , , , ,

Image Credits:

  1. Malcolm Isaacs
  2. Image #2: BuildItSolar.com

building-scienceheader image

The Difficulty of Updating Georgia’s Energy Code

Trying to get airtightness below 7 ach50 has been a struggle

Posted on May 10 2017 by Allison A. Bailes III, PhD
prime

Seven years ago, Georgia led the nation. Yep. We were the first state to adopt an energy code that made blower door testing mandatory. All new homes built in the state had to show through performance testing that they had an air leakage rate of less than 7 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals of pressure difference (ach50).


Tags: , , , ,

Image Credits:

  1. Energy Vanguard

guest-blogsheader image

Airport House: Choosing and Installing an ERV

No, tight houses do not need to breathe, but they do need a source of fresh air

Posted on May 2 2017 by Reid Baldwin

Editor’s note: This is one of a series of guest blogs by Reid Baldwin about the construction of his house in Linden, Michigan. For a list of previous blog posts on GBAGreenBuildingAdvisor.com by Reid Baldwin, see the “Related Articles” sidebar below. You can read his entire blog here.


Tags: , , , , ,

Image Credits:

  1. Reid Baldwin

Register for a free account and join the conversation


Get a free account and join the conversation!
Become a GBA PRO!

Syndicate content