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Home Energy Interviews Home Performance Experts

The magazine's “Legends of Home Performance” video series features building scientists, researchers, engineers, architects, policy makers, and an editor

Posted on Apr 25 2017 by GBA Team

Home Energy magazine is sponsoring a catalog of video interviews that it calls the “Legends of Home Performance” series. The videos were created by Debra Little.

Among the interviewees in the series are Robert Bean, Chris Benedict, Rick Chitwood, Gord Cooke, Henry Gifford, Martin Holladay, Gary Nelson, Sam Rashkin, Marc Rosenbaum, Nehemiah Stone, and John Straube.

The videos are available on YouTube.


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  1. Home Energy magazine - Legends of Home Performance

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Part 5 of GBA’s Passivhaus Video Series

‘Installing High-Performance Windows,’ the fifth episode in a series of videos on a Passivhaus project, shows the installation of triple-glazed Makrowin windows from Slovakia

Posted on Oct 7 2014 by GBA Team

At the PassivhausA residential building construction standard requiring very low levels of air leakage, very high levels of insulation, and windows with a very low U-factor. Developed in the early 1990s by Bo Adamson and Wolfgang Feist, the standard is now promoted by the Passivhaus Institut in Darmstadt, Germany. To meet the standard, a home must have an infiltration rate no greater than 0.60 AC/H @ 50 pascals, a maximum annual heating energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (4,755 Btu per square foot), a maximum annual cooling energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (1.39 kWh per square foot), and maximum source energy use for all purposes of 120 kWh per square meter (11.1 kWh per square foot). The standard recommends, but does not require, a maximum design heating load of 10 W per square meter and windows with a maximum U-factor of 0.14. The Passivhaus standard was developed for buildings in central and northern Europe; efforts are underway to clarify the best techniques to achieve the standard for buildings in hot climates. job site in Falmouth, Massachusetts, architect Steve Baczek specified triple-glazed Makrowin windows from Slovakia. The windows were installed as "in-betweenies," and the perimeter of each window was sealed with Siga Wigluv tape.

To make sure that the installations were watertight, each window was tested with a garden hose equipped with a spray nozzle after it was installed.


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  1. Taunton Press

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Part 4 of GBA’s Passivhaus Video Series

‘Framing for Efficiency’ is the fourth episode in a series of videos on the construction of a Passivhaus in ­Falmouth, Massachusetts

Posted on Jun 26 2014 by GBA Team

At the PassivhausA residential building construction standard requiring very low levels of air leakage, very high levels of insulation, and windows with a very low U-factor. Developed in the early 1990s by Bo Adamson and Wolfgang Feist, the standard is now promoted by the Passivhaus Institut in Darmstadt, Germany. To meet the standard, a home must have an infiltration rate no greater than 0.60 AC/H @ 50 pascals, a maximum annual heating energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (4,755 Btu per square foot), a maximum annual cooling energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (1.39 kWh per square foot), and maximum source energy use for all purposes of 120 kWh per square meter (11.1 kWh per square foot). The standard recommends, but does not require, a maximum design heating load of 10 W per square meter and windows with a maximum U-factor of 0.14. The Passivhaus standard was developed for buildings in central and northern Europe; efforts are underway to clarify the best techniques to achieve the standard for buildings in hot climates. job site in Falmouth, Massachusetts, architect Steve Baczek specified double-stud walls. The frame of a Passivhaus may not be as exciting as the thick layers of insulation, the high-tech mechanical ­systems, or the triple-glazed windows, but it plays a very important supporting role in achieving success.


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  1. Fine Homebuilding

Passive House video — Episode 4

In “Framing for Efficiency,” the fourth episode in a series of videos on Passivhaus construction, the framing crew erects double-stud walls

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Video: New Passivhaus Products

Katrin Klingenberg, founder of the Passive House Institute U.S., tours the trade-show floor at the BuildingEnergy 14 conference, pointing out her favorite windows, heat pumps, diagnostic tools, and more

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Produced by Dariusz Kanarek


Recorded at NESEANorth East Sustainable Energy Association. A regional membership organization promoting sustainable energy solutions. NESEA is committed to advancing three core elements: sustainable solutions, proven results and cutting-edge development in the field. States included in this region stretch from Maine to Maryland. www.nesea.org's Building Energy 14 conference in Boston on March 6, 2014, this video follows Katrin Klingenberg as she visits several trade show booths, including those of:

  • Mitusbishi heat pumps;
  • Intus windows;
  • The Energy Conservatory blower doors;
  • Schöck USA (Schöck Bauteile);
  • Stiebel Eltron water heaters;
  • Airpohoda ERVs;
  • Prosoco air sealing systems;
  • Power Wise energy monitoring systems;
  • H Window;
  • Zola windows;
  • Alpen Windows; and
  • Zehnder HRVs and ERVs.

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Passive House Video — Episode 1

Watch “Passive House Design,” the first episode in a 5-part video series on the theory, design, and construction of a Passive House.

To see the entire series, click here to become a GBAGreenBuildingAdvisor.com Prime member.

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Produced by: Colin Russell and Justin Fink


Join GBA Prime Today

To watch the complete Passive House series and read the companion Fine Homebuilding articles, click here to join GBA Prime. Then, join the conversation with Architect Steve Baczek in the comments at the bottom of this page.

THE PASSIVE HOUSEA residential building construction standard requiring very low levels of air leakage, very high levels of insulation, and windows with a very low U-factor. Developed in the early 1990s by Bo Adamson and Wolfgang Feist, the standard is now promoted by the Passivhaus Institut in Darmstadt, Germany. To meet the standard, a home must have an infiltration rate no greater than 0.60 AC/H @ 50 pascals, a maximum annual heating energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (4,755 Btu per square foot), a maximum annual cooling energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (1.39 kWh per square foot), and maximum source energy use for all purposes of 120 kWh per square meter (11.1 kWh per square foot). The standard recommends, but does not require, a maximum design heating load of 10 W per square meter and windows with a maximum U-factor of 0.14. The Passivhaus standard was developed for buildings in central and northern Europe; efforts are underway to clarify the best techniques to achieve the standard for buildings in hot climates. SERIES

Built to meet the world’s most rigorous standard for energy-efficient construction, a Passive House uses about one-tenth as much heating energy as a similarly sized older home. This feat is accomplished by carefully harmonizing countless design and construction details. At the time of this writing, just 71 houses have earned the Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS) certification. Architect Steve Baczek is responsible for designing a handful of them.

Episode 1: Designed for Success
One architect’s approach to designing a house to meet the country’s most stringent energy requirement

Read the article      (Watch video above)


Episode 2: Air-sealed Mudsill Assembly
You only have one chance to get this critical detail perfect

Read the article                Watch the video
         


Episode 3: Superinsulated Slab
If you aren’t insulating the edge, you’re only doing half the job

Read the article                Watch the video
         


Episode 4: Framing for Efficiency
Double-stud walls and trusses create the ideal shell for an economical and efficient building

Read the article                Watch the video
         


Episode 5: Installing High-Performance Windows
By far the weakest link in a Passive House, windows must be installed perfectly

Read the article               Watch the video
         

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Video: Duct Sealing and Leak Testing

Duct sealing and duct leakage testing: Two experts from Conservation Services Group, Eric Wilder and Will D’Arrigo, explain how to seal duct seams with mastic and how to use a Duct Blaster to test duct tightness

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Produced by Dariusz Kanarek and Mike Dobsevage; edited by Robin Burkin


OTHER VIDEOS FROM THE NESEANorth East Sustainable Energy Association. A regional membership organization promoting sustainable energy solutions. NESEA is committed to advancing three core elements: sustainable solutions, proven results and cutting-edge development in the field. States included in this region stretch from Maine to Maryland. www.nesea.org CONFERENCE

Video: Dense-packed cellulose

EDITOR’S PICKS

Duct Leakage Testing

Sealing Ducts: What’s Better, Tape or Mastic?

How to Track Down Leaks in Forced-Air Ductwork

Keeping Ducts Indoors

How to Install Flex Duct Properly

Fine Homebuilding: Testing and Sealing Ductwork

CONSTRUCTION DETAILS

Air seal at duct boot

Recorded at the demonstration stage at NESEANorth East Sustainable Energy Association. A regional membership organization promoting sustainable energy solutions. NESEA is committed to advancing three core elements: sustainable solutions, proven results and cutting-edge development in the field. States included in this region stretch from Maine to Maryland. www.nesea.org's Building Energy 13 conference in Boston on March 6, 2013, duct sealing experts Eric Wilder and Will D’Arrigo explain how to seal leaks in duct seams and how to conduct a duct leakage test.

Among the questions answered in this video:

  • Are any tapes durable enough for duct sealing?
  • When should I use mastic, and when should I use tape?
  • What kind of mastic should I use?
  • When should mastic be applied with a paint brush, and when should it be applied with a trowel?
  • Are there any changes to code requirements for duct sealing on the horizon?
  • Can I use a fogTo fog a room or building is to use a fog machine during a blower door test, revealing locations of air leaks where the fog escapes. The fogging material is usually a glycol-based solution, completely non-toxic. machine for duct leakage testing?
  • Are ducts tested at 25 pascals or 50 pascals?

Once you've seen duct sealing in action, and you've heard some of your questions answered by these two experts, you'll have the confidence to tackle duct sealing at your next job site.

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New Videos: Sealing Ducts and Installing Dense-Packed Cellulose

GBA presents two new videos, both recorded at NESEA's Building Energy 13 conference in Boston

Posted on Apr 17 2013 by GBA Team

GBAGreenBuildingAdvisor.com has released two new videos: one on installing dense-packed cellulose in stud cavities, and the other on sealing duct seams with mastic.

Both videos were recorded in March 2013 at NESEANorth East Sustainable Energy Association. A regional membership organization promoting sustainable energy solutions. NESEA is committed to advancing three core elements: sustainable solutions, proven results and cutting-edge development in the field. States included in this region stretch from Maine to Maryland. www.nesea.org's Building Energy 13 conference in Boston.


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  1. GBA video

Video: Duct Sealing and Leak Testing

Duct sealing and duct leakage testing: Two experts from Conservation Services Group, Eric Wilder and Will D’Arrigo, explain how to seal duct seams with mastic and how to use a Duct Blaster to test duct tightness

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