vinyl siding

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In Defense of Inconvenient Truths about Vinyl Siding

A response to comments posted on my earlier blog, ‘The Counterintuitive Cladding’

Posted on Apr 9 2015 by Fernando Pages Ruiz

A recent blog of mine, “The Counterintuitive Cladding,” discussed the “green” bona fides of vinylCommon term for polyvinyl chloride (PVC). In chemistry, vinyl refers to a carbon-and-hydrogen group (H2C=CH–) that attaches to another functional group, such as chlorine (vinyl chloride) or acetate (vinyl acetate). siding. The blog struck a variety of nerves, including from those who mistook an obvious opinion piece for a poorly written scientific paper.


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Image Credits:

  1. C.J. Hilado, “Flammability Handbook of Plastics,” 1982

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The Counterintuitive Cladding

Every major green building certification program allows the use of vinyl siding

Posted on Mar 10 2015 by Fernando Pages Ruiz

Justly or unjustly, we in the green building movement are often viewed as self-righteous. Most often we are on the forefront of the truth, introducing new building methods and specifying materials that not only protect the environment, but improve building quality. Other times we get it wrong. For example, in pursuit of energy efficiency we wrapped interior walls in plastic sheathingMaterial, usually plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), but sometimes wooden boards, installed on the exterior of wall studs, rafters, or roof trusses; siding or roofing installed on the sheathing—sometimes over strapping to create a rainscreen. to prevent air infiltration. This unwittingly trapped moisture in the walls, promoting mold and causing "sick building syndrome." But we learned, and we fixed it.


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Image Credits:

  1. Fine Homebuilding

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Vinyl Windows and Vinyl Siding

Can a house with plastic components be considered green?

Posted on Aug 16 2013 by Martin Holladay

Should vinylCommon term for polyvinyl chloride (PVC). In chemistry, vinyl refers to a carbon-and-hydrogen group (H2C=CH–) that attaches to another functional group, such as chlorine (vinyl chloride) or acetate (vinyl acetate). building materials be banned from green homes? Some environmentalists think so. There seem to be three categories of building materials that particularly irk the anti-PVC crowd: vinyl siding, vinyl windows, and vinyl flooring. Since there are alternatives to all of these materials, these environmentalists argue, green homes shouldn’t include any of them. (Although the anti-vinyl group sometimes mentions PVC pipe used for drains and vents, it seems that neither plastic pipe nor the vinyl insulation on Romex wiring raises as many hackles as vinyl siding, windows, and flooring.)


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Image Credits:

  1. Intus Windows

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Window Reflections Can Melt Vinyl Siding

Siding and window manufacturers are reluctant to discuss the problem

Posted on Aug 27 2010 by Martin Holladay

UPDATED September 3, 2013

In almost every corner of the U.S., reports are increasing of vinylCommon term for polyvinyl chloride (PVC). In chemistry, vinyl refers to a carbon-and-hydrogen group (H2C=CH–) that attaches to another functional group, such as chlorine (vinyl chloride) or acetate (vinyl acetate). siding that has been melted by sunlight bouncing off nearby windows. This melted-siding pandemic makes vinyl manufacturers very nervous — so nervous that the topic is rarely discussed.


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Image Credits:

  1. Robb Kowalik
  2. Tim Maxwell
  3. Joe Perry
  4. Clay Shaw
  5. TomC

Vinyl Siding

Vinyl Siding: Love It or Hate It

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Image Credits:

  1. Tom O'Brien and David Ericson/Fine Homebuilding #149
  2. Daniel S. Morrison/Fine Homebuilding
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