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7 Answers

Is there a way to move forward without removing the exterior 1" XPS rigid foam, Tyvek, and windows?

Last February I started the project of adding an entire second story to our 1946 1,550 sq. ft. ranch home in Southern Wisconsin. It is on the border of WI and IL. It could be considered in the northern part of climate zone 5A or southern part of zone 6A.

Asked By Steven Bessel | Aug 30 15
2 Answers

Vented attic vs. a sealed, non-vented, airtight attic

I'm building a new home in Miami, Fla.

An insulation contractor advises me to eliminate the planned roof & soffit vents and seal the attic with foam.
What are the Pros and Cons for maintaining attiic ventilation, and eliminating it?

Asked By Calvin Smith | Sep 1 15
8 Answers

Attic Ductwork

I live in Nashville, TN climate area 4A

My issue is my attic gets so hot in the summer months and my heat pump runs a lot but does not cool very well. This is a duplex home with each side having around 980 sq foot living space.

Asked By Janice West | Jul 11 15
1 Answer

Spray foaming around windows

When you spray foam (interior) around a window, is it best to try and not fill the area were the nailing flange hits the WRB? Wouldn't this be true because if the window ever did leak the water would have some place to go? An example is a youtube video I saw were they fully spay foam the four corners with Pur Black - but if water gets in were will it go - it will sit on top of the pur balck - unable to escape.

So it seems to me that I should only spray foam only about half way into the rough opening - thus leaving an escape path for any water intrusion if that were to occur.

Asked By Randy Mason | Sep 1 15
3 Answers

Wood stove installation and exterior foam board insulation

If I want to install a wood stove through the wall or the roof and both have 6" of foam board on the exterior, are there additional precautions to prevent exhaust heat duct from melting or causing a fire around the insulation? For example, install one or more layers of cement board over the 6" of foam. Then install through the wall or roof duct work.

Asked By HORST SCHMIDT | Jun 30 12
10 Answers

Retrofit / renovation to bring heating costs under control

Hi folks,

Thanks for creating this great resource for newbies like me to learn!

We're actually near Toronto, Canada, but I think you could consider us Zone 6A for your purposes. We bought our ~2000 ft^2 1981 home last year and suffered a horribly cold and expensive winter, so we'd like to take steps to bring that back in control.

Asked By Justin Allport | Aug 20 15
5 Answers

Do I need to follow the insulation code in any circumstance?

I am converting the sun room to bedroom.
The room is isolated from main building and faced with garage. Only 200sqft room.. no bathroom will be installed in the room.

The room have nothing but the roof above.

Asked By mansig yoon | Aug 26 15
8 Answers

Does leaving a service cavity on the inside of a double stud wall make sense?

Would there be anything wrong with the following assembly? From exterior to interior: Siding, furring, rigid insulation, sheathing (air seal and WRB), 2x4 stud wall, gap, netting stapled to inner studs. 2x4 stud wall, and finally drywall. The outer 2x4 stud wall and the gap would be filled with cellulose, but the inner 2x4 stud wall would be empty to allow easy wiring and plumbing.

This design seems to have some clear perks. Removed thermal bridges. You get a service cavity. The inner wall supports the netting, so it won't need excessive stapling.

Asked By John Ranson | Aug 27 15
9 Answers

Wall stack up opinions - using rigid foam as air barrier between double stud wall?

Hi,

I'm in climate zone 6A looking to build a partition wall between an attic bonus room. One side of the bonus room will remain as cold storage, and the other side will be heated by minisplits and resistance backup. I'm looking at building a double 2x4 wall separated by rigid foam. The exterior wall would be framed 24" o.c. to maximize insulation. There will be no plumbing or wires in the exterior wall. The interior framed 2x4 wall will be framed 16" o.c. and will contain wiring, and will possibly be plumbed for a sink.

From cold to warm, here is what I'm proposing:

Asked By Rick Van Handel | Aug 24 15
7 Answers

Zola Windows

Hello,

Asked By william dempsey | Aug 25 15
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