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23 Answers

Mitsubisi Heat Pump- heat and cool

I am building a 1 1/2 story barn/garage 36 X 34 with an open upstair 2nd floor. It will have 2" form in the walls and 3" sprayed form in the ceiling. Cement floor. not too many windows and 2 garage doors.

I don't need it heated like a home but just confortable when I work in the barn. I would like to keep it about 40 degrees in the winter when not in use and will rarely need it cool in the summer. I live in southern CT.

I've been looking at the high efficienty units around 24,000 BTU. I also need to be able to set the temperature low (about 40) when not in use.

Asked By Fred Gabriele | Jan 31 16
18 Answers

Perennial cathedral ceiling ice dam issue meets hot roof twist

Martin Holladay, I can imagine you grinding your teeth at yet another tongue and groove cathedral ceiling issue! I thought I could be smarter than the problem. #fail

Background: of our design http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/qa-spotlight/designing-hv...

Problem: double-walled stovepipe penetrating cathedral ceiling / hot roof appears to be source of heat leak, spurring ice dam and interior condensation on cathedral room walls. (see photos)

Asked By Randy Bunney | Feb 28 16
5 Answers

High humidity after a dehumidifier was installed

We have always had Humidity issues in our home. It was built in the 1930s, completed a complete removal 5 years ago. Roof is metal with spray foam insulation. The home contains an attic. Home is only 1,500 square feet. After installing new AC unit with standalone dehumidifier, Humidity still remains 55%+. Never has reached and stayed at 50% and has not gone lower. the dehumidifier just keeps running and running. The Cooling/heating company who did the install is very well known and does. Great work in the area.

Asked By Erica Sayers | Mar 9 16
2 Answers

Andersen 400 vs Pella 350

I am building a new home this summer and can say that windows are the most difficult thing that I've ever shopped for. Our home will be ICF to the eaves and spray foam in the attic. I intend on making sure it is well sealed and as energy efficient as possible within reason. I'm hoping to get some passive solar on the south facing wall, which is where most of the windows are located. I've been studying and pricing windows for a couple months now and have it down to two selections.

Asked By Shawn Henson | Mar 8 16
1 Answer

How to detail windows and doors with 4" exterior foam and brick...

Have not been able to find straightforward answers about how to detail and finish around windows and doors with 4" exterior foam and brick. If anyone could point me to some articles/images that would be greatly appreciated

Asked By Kellen James | Mar 8 16
7 Answers

Where to put the microwave?

Locating a microwave in a "luxury" kitchen is difficult because a main feature of a "high end luxury" kitchen is that it does not follow convention of putting in an over the range unit-as it would interfere with the aesthetics of the expensive fume hood. Does anyone have any original ideas for locating one that is ergonomically and aesthetically pleasing in the below kitchen that calls for one of those pesky microwave units? I have included a sketch of the kitchen. The yellow area is going to be a glass wall with a door---so that part is out.

Asked By Hal Sartelle | Feb 18 16
10 Answers

Pipe out through wall or rim joist?

I need to get a PVC pipe out from the garage. Can I just simply run it through the wall or does it have to go through the rim joist? What would be the benefit?

Asked By Joe Blanco | Mar 6 16
8 Answers

Add insulation when changing siding?

We are getting our windows done on our 40 year old over the next month (yes they are the original windows LOL). We currently have 2x4 walls with full insulation, zone 6 climate. Has anyone ever increased the insulation R value by adding styrofoam? We are residing the house within the next couple of years.
Thinking about adding 2 inch foam around 3/4 of the house (front wall is brick) just not sure if the cost recovery will be worth it (not to mention the difficulty in matching the wall that meets the brick wall due to the extra 2 inches). It looks like a 48x96 sheet will run $60.

Asked By Gary Belcourt | Feb 21 16
3 Answers

DC solar water heater viable?

I live in a state that makes it very hard to grid tie to utilities. On a duplex I own it has two 50 gallon electric water heaters. One for each side. My thought is to offset the over $1000 a year that it cost the renters. Its in a zone 6 so a normal solar water heater wouldn't work. Gas and renters do not mix so gas solutions are out of the question. The heat pump water heaters don't have enough space to operate, make noise and more likely to break down.

Asked By Stephen E | Mar 6 16
7 Answers

Radiant heat insulation between conditioned floors

Hi, I read your article questioning the need for radiant heat on a second floor. My question/concern relates to this but is particular to my situation.

I have installed radiant floor heat (not yet charged or insulated) in the first and second floor (separate zones) of my old farmhouse. I have all new low e windows and will be using spraying poly on the walls. The house will be tight! My contractor thought I may never use my second upstairs zone particularly, since I've also plumbed in a wood stove on the first floor. The bottom floor is 800 sf and the second is only 400 s.f.

Asked By w n | Mar 5 16
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