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3 Answers

After reading and reading and reading (including lots of GBA articles), I thought that I had this figured out. Our plan was to have a non-conditioned attic space, with continuous soffit ventilation along with ridge vents. After further reading, especially Dr. Joe's Top 10 List of Dumb Things to do in the South, I am confused. Please share whether you would vent an attic or not with the following considerations in mind:

- located in western North Carolina, zone 4, mixed humid
- one level, slab on grade home, approximately 2100 sq. ft.

Asked By Stacey Owens | Apr 15 14
1 Answer

I am installing new windows and cement board siding. We are adding an inch of foam board to the exterior. I know the siding can be nailed through the foam board into the sheathing by extending the length of the fastener, but can the same be said about nailing the window (flange) through the foam board? I realize that I have either that option or the option of building out my frame by an inch with OSB or ply so that I get a solid nailing surface. Is there a preference?

Asked By Matt Cibula | Apr 16 14
9 Answers

First, I'd like to thank the many pros and contributors here at GBA. I have been reading and learning for quite some time. Thank you all, first for caring about green building, and second, for being willing to share your time and expertise.

Asked By Stacey Owens | Mar 31 14
13 Answers

Hi! I've been following a variety of discussions about ventend/unvented assemblies in cathedral ceilings, in low slope roofs, in different climates, on FHB, JLC for close to two years. I’ve read Martin, I’ve read Lstiburek, I’ve talked to the architects (hopeless) and structural engineers. I thought I had this nailed down, and now the builder (who also happens to be a SE - long story), comes at me with a new idea.

So I’m finally going to “vent” my worries and seek some advice specific to our situation.

Asked By Michelle Paninopoulos | Apr 7 14
6 Answers

This rambling old farmhouse in rural Maine has an attached 3-bay garage that connects to the kitchen. The garage has a two-bedroom, seasonal or guest apartment overhead, so it is a large structure, with 2X4 studs.

Asked By Roger Woodbury | Apr 12 14
13 Answers

Im redoing my partial basement, to make it all into usable living space, which involves digging out half of it and removing a current half slab to increase headroom, and adding to the foundation/footing as needed. Is there any real reason to pour a slab after this is all done?
I would love input from someone who has put a vapor/water barrier, some foam insulation between 2=4 sleepers, and then used some form of wood flooring that would work for higher humidity situations.

Asked By rob rosen | Apr 5 14
7 Answers

Hey,

I am designing a small commercial building for a client in climate zone 5A.
The design has two thermal challenges I am looking to get opinions on. For brevity, I will address only one here.

Asked By Eric Whiting | Apr 10 14
2 Answers

Hey everyone,

I am designing a small commercial building for a client in Climate Zone 5A.
The design calls for largish overhangs on the south facade, and I am playing around with some ideas on how to build these.

Traditionally, the interior structure (in this case, timber frame) would bear on the interior, and the top chord of the truss or rafter tail would cantilever out to create the overhang. However, with this design there is automatic thermal bridging, and the building envelope is compromised.

Asked By Eric Whiting | Apr 10 14
2 Answers

The envelope is pretty good these days and adding more polyiso to
the inside of the basement wall has helped with overall heat loss
a little more, but I think there's still something going on in the
cinderblock wall that's affecting slab temperatures near the edge
and I wanted to float an idea for how I can better deal with that.

This is long, but one needs to understand the background and present
setup. Executive summary: should I insulate just the above-grade
exterior part of a foundation wall with Roxul panels?

Asked By Hobbit _ | Apr 7 14
1 Answer

I will have an ICF stem wall that will transition into the ICF house wall. The interior will be a slab-on-grade design. This is for a Zone 4B (desert) climate.

1 - Should the vapor barrier be on-top or below the rigid EPS?
2 - What thickness is good for a vapor barrier?
3 - Will 3" of rigid EPS suffice for a Zone 4B climate?
4 - Any links to some details showing the above condition?
5 - Should crushed & compacted rock be used below the EPS and concrete slab?

Asked By Peter L | Apr 8 14
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