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4 Answers

Don't you love radiant barrier websites? They are a constant source of amusement. My latest favorite stupidity comes from the EnergyFoil website, which helpfully defines R-value. Are you ready?

"An example would be a product with an R-Value of R-19 which means that it will take about 19 hours for the temperature on the inside to become the same as the temperature outside. R-38 = 38 hours, R-11 = 11 hours, etc."

And all these years, I mistakenly thought that R-value was 1/U.

Asked By Martin Holladay | Apr 24 14
2 Answers

In an answer to a recent question I had, Martin Holladay indicated that he has concerns about AirKrete shrinking and crumbling. According to the website and company representatives, AirKrete has 0% shrinkage and the formulation has been changed to alleviate the friability concerns.

I'm interested to know if anyone here has used AirKrete and, if so, what your experiences are with it.

Thanks in advance!

Asked By Stacey Owens | Apr 15 14
1 Answer

Since a SIP is basically like an I-beam type of setup, it relies heavily on the EPS foam core for its strength. The downside is that EPS begins to melt around 165F - 180F. Once the foam fails, the structure fails/collapses.

Has anyone observed or read about a SIP roof or SIP wall home being involved in a fire? If so, what was the outcome?

What's the hottest temperature that a SIP roof can get? I assume in the desert southwest a SIP with a metal roof on top can see some high temps. Is it hot enough to melt the EPS core?

Asked By Peter L | Apr 16 14
1 Answer

I have an 8 year old structural-insulated-panel house. It is tight, has good siting, big roof overhangs and performs well with passive heating and concrete floor hydronics. It has no air conditioning. In my climate we can get a week of 110 to 115 degree highs and 70 degree lows when the small whole house fan makes it difficult to sleep due to noise.

Asked By Joel Levine | Apr 14 14
6 Answers

Is anything like Uni-Solar Powerbond still made?

It seems like a much much more aesthetic form of PV than conventional panels, especially if it were sized correctly to cover the whole south-facing side of a roof. The ideal would be a solar shingle solution that actually looked like shingles or slates, but this doesn't seem to exist.

I know Uni-Solar filed for bankruptcy so I assume this product isn't being made any more? Is that the case? If so, where did it all go wrong?

Asked By F W | Apr 10 14
2 Answers

http://www.roxul.com/products/building+envelope/roxul+afb

Looking to use Roxul stone wool batts in the ceiling area. Anyone here know about any air quality testing with these batts? Even though it will be behind 1/2" drywall, are there any issues with the fine particles from the batts or any off-gassing?

Asked By Peter L | Mar 31 14
6 Answers

I appreciate any help I can get on this: We recently built an energy-efficient greenhouse and the mason just finished building the concrete block raised beds. We need to seal or install a liner inside the raised beds to keep water (from the soil) from leaching through the seams of the concrete and we also need this sealer/liner to be safe for growing edible plants and trees (i.e. not leaching contaminates into our soil). We will mostly be growing fruit trees but plan on growing vegetables as well. Can anyone give us advice one what products would be appropriate?

Asked By Leah Marshquist | Apr 10 14
2 Answers

Much like the title says, I am having trouble finding appropriate flat roof vents for two spot ERV units I am installing. I don't think I have an issue with the exhaust, as I would think that any roof vent would work. I am having more trouble trying to find a roof vent for a flat roof for the intake side, which as I understand it, would need to not have a gravity damper on it.

Asked By Wayne Weikel | Apr 9 14
9 Answers

We are building a new house and in research insulation options I decided on dense-packed cellulose. My builder seems very opposed to it. He uses blown-in fiberglass. He said he had problems in the past with settling. He also thinks the R-value is probably higher with blown-in. Any advice would be really appreciated.

Asked By Shannon Kistler | Apr 6 14
1 Answer

I saw a prototype window a while back... It had 10 or 12 or so layers of glass. Anyone have a link to this article?

Asked By erik olofsson | Apr 3 14
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