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4 Answers

Yet another window question (YAWQ): Pella Impervia feedback?

Hello,

I'm building a house in central Oregon (zone 5). It's a mostly passive solar design, with CMU shell construction that is insulated on the outside (my builder has a patented method to attach insulation to exterior of CMU walls) and this plus a mix of tile and concrete floors means I have a huge amount of thermal mass.

So we're considering using Pella Impervia with their high SHGC "Natural Sun" glazing for five of the main south-facing 42" x 112" windows (Alpen and their better U-value is planned for the other 30+ windows).

Asked By D Wadsworth | Jan 28 15
15 Answers

Rigid foam interior or exterior of basement?

I live in zone 5 and am planning to start the concrete work next month. Right now I am at or just over budget without factoring in any rigid foam insulation for the basement.

Asked By Nicholas C | Apr 6 15
10 Answers

Inductive cooktops and peak electric loads

I've been reading Dana's explanations at GBA that peak electric loads are the primary reason for the total electricity capacity required of any given utility. I understand that devices like electric point of use water heaters will easily drive higher those peak electricity requirements for the grid infrastructure. What about inductive cooktops? My understanding, which is limited, is that they have a much higher peak electricity requirement than standard electric ranges.

Asked By Eric Habegger | May 19 15
3 Answers

We live in an 1895-converted carriage house with an cold damp basement

We live in an 1895-converted carriage house with an cold damp basement made of field stone. We removed mold in the fall and now have the experience of a basement with an average temp of 36 degrees this past winter. SPF was suggested.

We understand EPA is in the midst of looking at long-term outgassing (suggested in a 2011 GBA article), but does not have any answer yet. There was a comment that some chemicals currently used MIGHT be banned in the future....but what facts can a homewowner use to determine whether or not SPF is safe long-term at this time?

Asked By Sandra Thomas | May 18 15
4 Answers

PV and EMF

I hope the title of this post isn't provocative, but I would like to ask an earnest question about photovoltaics and magnetic fields. The link below connects to a study of electric and magnetic fields near residential and commercial PV arrays.

http://images.masscec.com/uploads/attachments/Create%20Basic%20page/Stud...

Asked By Jeffrey S | May 15 15
24 Answers

Exposed Wigluv tape

The spec sheet for Siga Wigluv tape claims that it is "UV stable". Does
this imply that it's appropriate for little seal-up jobs on the exterior?
There are a couple of funky end-cap joints on my metal roof which could
let water in if windblown rain arrives horizontally, and I'm thinking
a slap of Wigluv over the slots would be an acceptable fix if it's
likely to last more than a couple of years under sun exposure.

Or are any of these products too new to really know? Did any of the
Siga offerings make it into the "backyard tape test"?

_H*

Asked By Hobbit | May 9 15
1 Answer

Are Europly, Appleply or good Baltic Birch plywood available in Vermont?

I am specifying materials for millwork and want to use a good baltic birch plywood so I can expose the edges (rather than edgebanding). What is available and a good/not too pricy choice in Vermont?

Asked By Anke Tremback | May 13 15
2 Answers

XPS & global warming: Updates?

I keep reading that different, less harmful blowing agents than HFC-134a were supposed to come online for XPS foam. Some of these articles date back a few years, and make it sound like the change was imminent. Did any of this ever come to pass? Or are we still dealing with the status quo? The latest article of this kind was on GBA a few months ago. http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/green-building-news/new-b...

Asked By Peter Rogers | May 12 15
51 Answers

Odor problem in attic after spray foam applied

Hello,

I am looking for any advice or suggestions with regards to a situation we are now dealing with in my home after changing our vented attic to a non-vented attic or semi-conditioned space.

Asked By Dave | Jul 11 10
28 Answers

Rainscreen differences when using mineral wool rather than foam?

Need to replace siding and roofing on my 1942-vintage house. Climate 4C. 8-in-12 gable roof. 2x4 walls.

Because I'll be removing all the contact-clad stucco and replacing it with rainscreened Hardi-Board, I thought it would be a good opportunity to add insulation to the outside of the house (right down to the footings). Ditto with the roof. Thought it'd be a good opportunity to add on over/under-roof with an air gap on top of the new insulation.

Asked By John Charlesworth | Apr 9 15
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