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0 Answers

Best practice for extending out a wall

Hi GBA,

I have a 2nd floor gable end wall which is constructed of (from outside) brick, air gap, block, air gap, 3/4" plaster/blueboard. There is no framing/insulation in the wall. We are converting an existing closet to an opening and to part of the above wall will be furred out with 2x4's. I would like to insulate it while we are in there but as always don't want to create issues.

Asked By G S | Jun 29 16
13 Answers

Zone 1 home addition — Dual-zone HVAC strategy?

I'm building a 1,700 sq. foot single story addition to my home in Houston, TX. 1,000 sq foot are a woodworking shop, 700 sq feet are living space. Living space is multi-room, think small apartment (kitchen/den, bedroom, bathroom, closet). Shop is one big room with a separate mechanical room. My current HVAC system won't handle the 700 sq feet of living space, which is also on the opposite side of the shop (maybe 100' from the current hot-attic system).

Current house is traditional stick frame, brick veneer with batt insulation and blown-in in attic. Gas available for heat.

Asked By Mark McFarlane | Jun 27 16
5 Answers

Would IGU windows using laminated glass be the preferred choice to eliminate UV?

I am considering the use of an Insulating Glass unit (IGU) using laminated glass. I assume the laminated glass will be on the interior side. I live in Seattle so air conditioning is needed only 3 months/year. I want low U-factor and high light transmittance (70% is ideal). Also want to kill UV as much as possible. Laminated glass will kill 99% of the UV while some LoE coatings can give 95% but reduces the transmittance to 66%.

Here is a possible configuration using Cardinal Glass:
a) Outboad lite is 3mm glass with LoE270 on surface #2 (and perhaps LoE-x89 on surface #1)

Asked By Mike Chapman | Jun 28 16
15 Answers

Eastern Canada 'pretty good house' Insulation strategies

I've read so many articles my head is spinning. I'm building in New Brunswick Canada which appears to be equivalent to your climate zone 7. I'm endeavouring to build a pretty good house meaning efficiency to the point of diminishing returns aka maximum value. One of the major challenges I have here is reconciling good building practices I'm reading about here with the capabilities of local contractors. With that said, I have a few questions.

Asked By Barry Reicker | Jun 14 16
3 Answers

5-inch EPS foam

Hello, I am looking to build a 24x30x10 pole barn to use as a shop/ extra garage. I am not planning to use concrete on the flooring just yet because of the cost. Eventually I would like to pour a slab though. I am researching insulation and think I will use a radiant barrier for the roof to under the metal sheets to reflect the roof heat. Actually the siding is metal as well. I was also given (84) used but in great condition 4x8 sheets of 5" eps foam. I am trying to figure the best way to go about it all. Any would be grateful for any suggestions.

Jeramia

Asked By Jeramia Johnson | Jun 29 16
6 Answers

Insulating the underside of a concrete deck

I have a 2-story garage project where the lower level is built with ICF walls...R-25....and PEX radiant heated floors with an R-10 underslab insulation but the ceiling consists of the metal concrete pans and +/- 8" of concrete and rebar. Assume that space above is unheated.....it might also get insulated and heated from time to time when the homeowner needs to do automotive work.....but in general it will be unheated.

Asked By Jonathan Scholl | Jun 27 16
6 Answers

Insulation opportunity: re-roofing a 1922 house

Hello,
I've scoured the archives as best I can and despite lots of great information I've had trouble applying what I've learned to my specific project. Our house is a 1922 craftsman style home with a finished attic. There is currently no access to the unfinished edges or peak of the attic so we're hoping to upgrade our insulation situation while the roof is off.

The house has gable vents that access the unfinished corner edges and peak (4 per side of house).

Asked By Jeremy Cram | Jun 28 16
11 Answers

Anyone have experience with Chilltrix equipment?

A client has asked me to evaluation Chilltrix HVAC systems:http://www.chiltrix.com/small-chiller-home.html.

It appears to be an inverter driven mini split style system that uses a chiller rather than a condenser. I am assuming that it uses and expels significant amounts of water as it does not use a refrigerant, but their documentation is not very specific.

Any feedback would be appreciated.

Asked By Carl | Oct 4 15
41 Answers

Best exterior wall design within standard 2x8 dimensions

I have been reading several of the GBA posts and articles and I don’t seem to locate the answer to my question so I wanted to drop you a line by email.

I am located in Saskatchewan, Canada and currently have a house under construction that is well under way. That being said I won’t over complicate it with detail but the house is not a high efficiency design and I am not and don't pretend to be knowledgeable on a lot of points that are covered on GBA.

Hhowever, this is what i have

Construction detail:

Southeast corner of Saskatchewan, Canada 15 miles north of North Dakota

Asked By chad online:) | Feb 21 16
3 Answers

Closed-cell foam versus thermal bridging

I have read several of Martin's articles and reader responses regarding the benefits of using closed cell spray foam on the underside of unvented roof decks. Because it is vapor impermeable, you can spray the underside of the roof without fear of vapor migration to the cold sheathing...so long as it is the proper R-value..... which would then cause rot over time. That's all good. In a cathedral ceiling or gable end wall, what happens to the rafters or studs which cannot be encased in the foam due to the need for drywall?

Asked By Jonathan Scholl | Jun 27 16
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