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2 Answers

Polyiso on interior

Martin/Dana

Living in the Bellingham area north of Seattle it can get cold. The house was heated by propane, it was a cost that was hard to get hold of especially with some of the design of the house. (high ceiling)

I set out to improve the insulation of the home taking bits and pieces off the internet as to the techniques available these days.

I am a bit "OCD" now that the living room is for the most part done "I have some hidden inward worries". I wonder if I am trapping moisture inside my walls having used the foilfaced polyiso just behind the sheetrock.

Asked By William Lucrisia | Nov 21 14
7 Answers

Options for garage heat

I would like opinions regarding options for heating a garage. I know, I know, "Why the H@!! are you heating a garage?" will come to mind for many of you. Others will agree that it saves on car repair costs, improves longevity, and allows for storage of "perishables" such as paint cans, bulk canned garden vegetables, and other things wife understandably does not want in house.

Here are the pertinent factors shaping the decision:
* Super-insulated house, Manual J heat load calc gives 12,400 BTU/h (3.6 kW) peak heating requirement (for garage alone)

Asked By Kent Jeffery | Nov 20 14
0 Answers

Is this ridiculous?

We live in a 1600 sqft 2 level end unit rowhouse with structural historic masonry walls from the 1890s.

Housing is really expensive where we live, figure between $400-500 per square foot, so we're trying to balance efficiency & comfort with sacrifices of this valuable square footage. We have a crawl space and attic, and intend to condition both so we can run ductwork without replacing the joists on the second floor.

Asked By Mike Madowitz | Nov 21 14
4 Answers

Home energy monitoring programs

I am building a net zero energy home to Passive House standards in the Seattle area. In addition to having it be as efficient as possible, my goals were to use renewable materials (no foam), eliminate thermal bridging. have a protected air-barrier and to keep the OSB warm. I'm using dense packed cellulose in the R-50 walls and R-85 roof (cathedral ceiling with parallel chord trusses). The wall assembly is a double stud system with an inner 2x6 load bearing wall and an outer 2x4 wall.

Asked By Gerald Blycker | Nov 21 14
64 Answers

Do I really need 4 minisplits?

My wife and I own a lot in a development in the Pacific NW (Zone 4c), and we are planning to build our retirement house on it. We have never built a house before. Our projected house (which we designed ourselves) is 1,833 sq. ft. on one story, a modified California-style bungalow, as simple in geometry as we could make it.

Asked By Gordon Taylor | Jan 23 12
54 Answers

Dealing with mold on the inside of OSB sheathing

Zip code 53951, south central WI, zone 6a.

Working in non-perfect situation - occupying unfinished house and can't afford to finish it up in timely manner. Heated by central air furnace with supplemental wood burning stove heat. Plan is to finish walls first and after we can afford to do the infloor heat, finish ceilings (2 stories to do)

Moved in early October, found mold about week ago (late February), when moved some fiberglass for new electrical box. Still recovering from the shock...

Here is wall profile, all new materials:
- (no siding yet)

Asked By Nick Zees | Mar 3 13
3 Answers

Insulating a cathedral ceiling

I am trying to find an effective way to insulate a cathedral ceiling (with collar ties) in zone 5 south of Chicago. I have read many of the postings and have gathered much information, but am still hesitant due to the moisture drying to one side issue.

What I have is 2x6 rafters on a 4/12. I am doing a complete remodel and plan on removing the existing drywall and insulation. I want to verify the existence (or not) of ventilation chutes from eave to ridge.

Asked By jon cypert | Nov 25 11
2 Answers

Insulating a crawl space

Situation: Existing uninsulated very shallow crawl space with a concrete floor that doesn't have insulation or vapor barrier under the slab located in climate zone 6 just a few miles south of the "border" for climate zone 7.

My plan is to insulate the space with 4" on the walls and 2" on the slab of type 1 EPS and then cover that with about as much blown cellulose as I can fit in the space (about 2' high). It is empty space - no mechanicals of any sort in there.

Asked By Greg Smith | Oct 4 13
4 Answers

Dryer vent in air-tight Passive House

I am building a house in the Seattle area to Passive House standards. After spending countless hours sealing every crack, seam and penetration to achieve under 0.6 ACH, creating a 4 inch diameter hole in my air barrier pains me. I've looked into condensing dryers that are used in some European Passive Houses, but they seam to take much longer to dry and use lots of water. Since I will be installing a vented dryer (unless someone can come up with another solution), are there ways to make the dryer wall vent more air-tight when the dryer is not in use?

Asked By Gerald Blycker | Nov 21 14
1 Answer

Vent separations and strategies

I'm building a home where I'm venting a high efficiency propane forced air furnace, a HRV (stale indoor/fresh outdoor), an on demand water heater, and a propane dryer from a mechanical room in about 8 feet of horizontal wall area. Additionally, I'm spot ventilating a range hood and bathroom fan on adjacent walls. My biggest concern is that I have dry fresh air for the HRV. There aren't any windows to really worry about and the mechanical room is on the first floor of a two story home so I can go up with some of the vents.

Asked By Jack Nichols | Nov 20 14
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