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2 Answers

Interior window shutter/slider

Hi,
Newbie here. Planning a new house in zone 10-high desert of California. Going with cmu exterior wall with separate 2x4 stud wall. Double wall basicsally, instead of strapping onto cmu for drywall. Thinking of leaving a 1-2" gap between the 2 walls and using that gap to house a sliding/pocket shutter to greatly increase the effective R value if all windows. Haven't seen any good commercially available products and I don't want to Mickey Mouse a diy shutter. Anybody try this? Any insights?

TIA

Asked By keithtom | Aug 17 17
4 Answers

How do I solve a backdraft issue in an airtight house with a three flue chimney?

There is a wood stove in the basement, a fireplace in the living room and a BBQ place in the kitchen. Each has their own flue. When I light a fire in the fireplace, it draws air back into the house through the BBQ flue. If I open a window in the dining room, it stops drawing air down that flue. Unless there is a wind out of the North West, then it is still a problem. Smoke from the chimney flue goes up and out and then gets sucked back in the BBQ flue and comes out in the kitchen.

Asked By Luke Thompson | Jul 30 17
8 Answers

Surface-mounted LEDs

I understand how recessed lights are a problem with air sealing, so I want to go with surface mounted LEDs wherever I can. So, how are these mounted and wired? Is a 4" box sealed with foam and then the box sealed to the ceiling, followed by the surface mount?

Also, are there any smart LED fixtures that work with Google Home?

Thanks,

Norman
CZ 3A

Asked By Norman Bunn | Aug 16 17
1 Answer

Turning a barn into a house: Roof quandary

Hi GBA community!
I am in the midst of converting a not too old timber framed barn into a house for a friend/client. It's going well, and we have a good plan for the thermal enclosure, in my opinion. There's a small matter of the roof, though.

Asked By David Bailey | Aug 16 17
13 Answers

Insulation retrofit

Looking for some advice on a smallish rehab project I am about to start. I've read many of the great articles and Q&A discussions here, so I think have bit of direction...but as I am novice, I am interested in some feedback before I moved forward.

Asked By Jeremy Kachejian | Jan 12 17
1 Answer

Sealing exhaust fans

Most exhaust fans you get from Home Depot have tons of places for air to leak through. Is there a good way to seal these or are there better fan options out there?

Thanks,

Norman
CZ 3A

Asked By Norman Bunn | Aug 16 17
8 Answers

Interior Rigid Foam on Solid Masonry Walls--Am I Going to be Okay?

I have bought a home with solid masonry walls (CMU block interior wythe, concrete "crick" exterior wythe, plaster on the interior of the wall). I would like to add rigid foam insulation to the interior, with a gypsum board interior finish. The foam would be 1.5" XPS (caulk around sheet perimeter, foam and/or tape between sheets) , then 3/4" furring strips 24"OC, affixed with Tapcons to the block, with 3/4" XPS between the furring strips. Attach drywall to the furring strips.
The home is near Dayton, Oh (extreme southern part of Zone 5).

Asked By Mark Waldron | Aug 15 17
6 Answers

Re-roofing a flat roof in Utah

Hello,

I'm re-roofing our flat roof single-story home in northern Utah -- dry summers and sometimes snowy winters. Air humidity is very low and we get about 19" of precipitation, much of which is snow. We have about 2650 ft2 of conditioned space (walk-out basement) and used 510 therms of natural gas last year for heating at a cost of about $500 with a forced air gas furnace that is probably < 75% efficient. The interior of the house is tight based on a blower door test.

Asked By mtaylor12345 | Aug 15 17
5 Answers

Advice on tight building

I have my house rough framed, we are framing out the roof now. Climate Zone 2 ( Just north of Austin). 2x6 conventional framing 16 on center, and has the typical double headers around windows etc. I am nearing having to lock down my decisions on sheething, insulation etc. I have been considering using Zip R for a couple reasons.

1. breaks my thermal mass, that I have plenty of
2. Weather and air seal.

It is anything but cheap, I am looking probably 7000 for the 1inch.

However I am looking at other options

Asked By Sleaton | Aug 15 17
2 Answers

Paper-faced fiberglass batts in attic, mixed with cellulose?

On new construction - I am thinking about doing 12" Paper Faced Fiberglass for parts of the roof that are going to be hard to get to (hip roof) and then using cellulose everywhere else after the ceiling is drywalled. I know that adding cellulose on top of existing paper-faced fiberglass is common.

My question is, is there anything wrong with mixing the two types? I can easily blow in cellulose for 75% of the attic area, but the far corners will be very difficult, and insulating from below before hanging the ceiling drywall would be easier.

Asked By Nicholas C | Aug 16 17
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