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2 Answers

We built a home twenty years ago and used wooden, cedar clapboards on the exterior. The builder didn't strap over the Tyvek and we developed severe wall rot after a number of years. We literally replaced studs and sheathing and then used tar paper and strapped the walls etc., but we still cannot keep paint on any of our three buildings. The top of the barn wall which is outside of the in insulated loft is fine.

Asked By Rob NORTHRUP | Aug 7 14
22 Answers

Hi,

We are building a duplex in Yellowknife, Canada - climate zone 8 (design temp minus 45 - same as Fairbanks).

Our winters are long and dark so some sort of (external) insulated window shutter is a huge energy saving opportunity. Our walls are going to R50, while triple pane windows get about R4.

I'm thinking of using 2-3 inches of Roxul board sandwiched between wood. That could give up to R12.

Asked By Andrew Robinson | Jun 10 14
4 Answers

old house with walk up, unfinished attic. some old insulation under floor boards. don't want to lose floor space which is used for storage. taking up floor to air seal around lights, etc. so I am already in the space. can I put rigid foam in between joists before putting floor planks back down. Not much room there for adding cellulose or fiberglass. foam panels have more r-value. attic has vent at ridge and small windows in gable.

Asked By Tom O'Brien | Aug 6 14
1 Answer

I live in a townhouse community and the maintenance company is starting the annual power washing. I noticed that the crew doing the power washing are power washing the vented soffits which in my opinion is forcing water up into the soffit and knowing the construction of the houses, water is getting into the insulation. First, it is a good idea to power wash vinyl siding, and if so or if not, can you direct me to sources showing the problems with power washing a vinyl house

Thanks,
Mark Yuschak

Asked By Mark Yuschak | Aug 6 14
2 Answers

We are building a tiny house currently with cathedral ceilings and 2x6 rafters. I have access to large quantities of rigid foam and would like to make use of it. Can I fill the rafter spaces with layers of rigid foam and spray can foam the seams and cracks of each layer as an air barrier and keep the roof unvented? I would then like to add another layer of rigid under the rafters with taped seams to prevent thermal bridging and air leakage once again. Then I would strap under that so I could still install T&G on the ceiling.

Asked By jordan Saunders | Aug 5 14
6 Answers

Hello all,

I am working with an HVAC contractor to design and install a multisplit system for our 1950s ranch renovation. As an FYI, we've done a substantial amount of upgrades to improve the tightness and insulation of the home although at 60 years old the house still isn't perfect. I'm now hoping to replace our aging ducted air handler with a new ductless system. Motivation to go ductless is driven by many factors that I won't get into in this post (both efficiency and a more practical issue of headroom in our finished basement).

Asked By Brian Gray | Jul 31 14
2 Answers

We are in Minneapolis with a 1923 Tudor house. Last year was our first winter in the house. We had bad ice damns last year and there is plenty of evidence it has had problems in the past. The second floor is a full story and consists of a shed dormer addition with no venting that I can see. The rest/original of the roof has minimal venting due to lack of (none) eves. There are only pots, but no soffit venting. Half of the story is unconditioned attic is accessible and is on the same floor as the living space. Access through a full size door.

Asked By Joe Sweeney | Aug 4 14
3 Answers

The existing brick remains and interior wall framing would
Be new 2x4 wall.
There would be no brick mould.
I was thinking using a plywood box to line the opening
But the flashing details would be a concern
Any suggestions.perhaps using a product from tremco called exoair

Asked By mark mahon | Aug 1 14
4 Answers

Plans also call for two 4" cans 5 feet behind sinks for lighting by the closet. The contractor wants to add two recessed 4" cans above sinks (on dimmers). We also have a large skylight in the room. Advice? Thank you!

Asked By Suzanne Taylor | Aug 4 14
1 Answer

We need some honest opinion and some guidance.

We are building a small summer home in northern NH. We had a family member pass away and have had to take time away from building in order to put some family affairs in order. As a result we won't be able to complete all the work we need to complete before we leave in a week.

We don't think we have time to put up siding before we go.. However, the sheathing is mounted and taped on the house. (The roof is shingled already.)

Left as such, would the Zip System sheathing survive a New Hampshire winter without siding to cover it?

Asked By chase orton | Aug 4 14
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