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3 Answers

Sturbridge, Massachusetts — electric boiler

Sturbridge, MA. Have abundant PV, similar to Ed Jones' question. Need electric boiler recommendations. 40 panel ground mount lease. Put in at the height of recent depression. VG deal.

Property has small slab, under 900' sqft,, 3'' foam under and sides. low e glass, 2x6 walls.

Have abundant solar PV, no electric bill, even this winter. I do clean the panels after storms.

Current fuel is wood, we do not need to discuss.

I would rather use up more solar electricity, instead of sell it back to the grid.

Asked By howard kelley | Feb 28 15
1 Answer

Converting fiberglass+plastic basement insulation to rigid foam - worth it?

Brick/masonry house with a concrete, finished basement.

The foundation walls are insulated with R11 fiberglass, topped with plastic, and covered with drywall.

I've read vapor barriers below-grade are bad & that wet fiberglass is useless as an insulating material.

Am I overthinking the usefulness in tearing down the drywall in the basement, removing the fiberglass/plastic, and installing rigid foam boards instead?

Asked By Jeff Watson | Feb 28 15
3 Answers

Dense packing cellulose - height of cavity

What are the thoughts out there on how tall a cavity in this double stud wall can be before there are concerns?

Here's the wall:

There's an outer 2x6 wall, 16" O.C., and an inner 2x4 wall also 16" o.c. There's a 6" space between the inner and outer studs, for a cavity depth of 15".

The first floor walls are 9' tall, with an 18" deep floor truss above. In other words, there will be a 10.5' height of cellulose. The second floor is about 8'4".

Asked By Graham Fisher | Feb 28 15
15 Answers

Recommendation for minisplits vs. gas-fired HVAC for new Massachusetts building

I am building an energy efficient 15 unit apartment building in MA this spring. We can either go natural gas or electric. I am considering going all electric since the MA Energy Code is so stringent and the heat load will be relatively small even though there are very cold temps at times. We might even put on solar panels for the house meter.
The electric units would take up much less space and I would rather not have to put in gas at all. I am not thrilled about electric hot water heaters but understand that the newer tankless units are much better.
Any input would be appreciated.

Asked By Bill Perkins | Feb 25 15
6 Answers

Foil-faced batt insulation effect on wall construction?

I’m in the process of planning energy retrofit for my house located in Philadelphia (zone 4A)
Existing wall construction consists of t1-11 over 2x4 framing with foil-faced batt insulation. The plan is to add 2 layers of 2” polyiso to the exterior taping joints making polyiso my WRB. Is there any concern that moisture trapped in the wall cavity won’t be able to dry to the interior due to foil faced batt insulation?

thanks!

Asked By Michael Kalustov | Feb 27 15
12 Answers

"Pretty good house" window choices

Hi, we are in the design stage of a high efficiency retrofit and addition to an 1888 Victorian house in the Chicago suburbs. Our architect and his preferred builder are leading many of the Passive house projects in the area and are very interested in getting our project to approach those standards. Although i think it would be very cool as well, i am finding that the technical approaches and costs simply don't justify the benefits. In doing my own research, i am leaning towards designing for "pretty good" near net-zero instead of near-passive.

Asked By alok khuntia | Feb 27 15
3 Answers

Insulation question

I have an apartment want to add insulation from the exterior.
It is a block building 1950's vintage. Walls in the inside are stripped with 3/4 furring strip. Insulated with 3/4" fiberglass with vapor barrier on inside. Finished inside with plastered walls.
I am thinking of adding foam sheet insulation to the outside of the building. I do not want to trap in moisture and cause mold problems. .
What is the proper way to do this. I do my own work. If anyone can guide me in the right direction I would appreciate it.

Thank You,

Asked By Charles Craig | Feb 24 15
3 Answers

Multi split with ceiling fans?

I am looking into a multisplit heat pump system for our deep energy retrofit project. We are used to leaky homes with ceiling fans in all bedrooms while sleeping. We find the moving air to be very comfortable while sleeping. In fact we noticeably miss the fans when traveling even when there is a dedicated Hvac like in a hotel room. In general, is the modern usage of the term 'comfort' (meaning stable temperature and humidity) consistent with our desire to feel the lightly moving air when sleeping?

Asked By alok khuntia | Feb 27 15
2 Answers

How to properly vent a modfied gambrel roof?

Hi,
My family and I purchased a 2 story modified Gambrel style home 5 years ago. By modified, I mean that the vertical roof sides go all the way to the foundation. So we have sloped interior walls upstairs and downstairs.

Asked By Charlie Baxley | Feb 23 15
5 Answers

I'm converting a barn to a residence

The slab is not insulated, and there are no below-grade details beyond the posts that support the structure. My architect is resistant to insulating on top of the slab. He worries that if I don't leech heat into the soil...

The slab is 64' x 46', and 4" thick. The central section was tapered toward center drains, so we have some leveling to do. We are in zone 5, I believe, and temperatures have recently dropped to -18F, though that is unusually cold. My concerns are comfort as well as avoiding condensation that might degrade floor coverings and encourage mold growth.

Asked By Dean McCracken | Feb 25 15
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