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8 Answers

I have followed the blogs on the heat loss problems of ceiling can lights. If one replaces the PAR30 incandescent with an ECOSMART LED and caulk the rim of the LED trim with silicone, the entire unit should be air tight, since the light itself is a closed

Asked By Jack Pladziewicz | Jun 27 14
6 Answers

I have a simple question about EPS that I'm sure one of you can answer for me. Outside of buildings I encounter EPS in two places where it seems to act in very different ways. I see foam anchor buoys and fish floats off our coast and washed up on the beach that seem to maintain their buoyancy and lightness or years. But those of you with hot tubs will have noticed that the foam inserts gain weight over time and within a couple of years the initially light cover can easily triple its weight.

Asked By Malcolm Taylor | Jul 10 14
1 Answer

Maybe I'm not asking Mr Google the right question, but I'm not finding anything on the life expectancy of air sealing tapes & flashing tapes. I've seen the backyard tape test, but that doesn't answer the question of how the tapes will be performing in 20+ years. Any suggestions on where to look or particular tapes to recommend ?

Asked By Roy Goodwin | Jul 12 14
1 Answer

I'm looking for a detail for integrating an insect screen with vertical corrugated metal siding that is meant to function as rainscreen.

Are the typical metal J-trims and flashings enough to keep bugs out of the corrugated flutes or is there a better way?

Asked By Daryl Ross | Jul 12 14
2 Answers

Imagine the Lincoln Family (of 4) Live in North America
They don't care at all about Privacy
They do care very much about Comfort

Could they be "Comfortable" in a One Room "Cabin"
Heated and Cooled by a Single Ductless Mini-Split?

What if they Lived in San Francisco?
Or North Ontario?

Asked By John Brooks | Jul 12 14
2 Answers

22 year old home, T1-11 wood siding failing (cupping, delaminating, peeling away). T1-11 is siding over 1/2" blueboard over 2 X 4 framing (16" o.c.), with blown-in cellulose insulation, 1/2" sheetrock inside. Can I cut out damaged sections of siding, patch back in with OSB or 1 by roughsawn, then 15# roofing felt, then corrugated metal low and traditional stucco above? Dry, windy climate, intense sun, low interior humidity, limited budget. Any thoughts / suggestions? Thanks in advance.

Asked By Joe Sweeney | Jul 11 14
26 Answers

I thought I was on the right track but I am not so sure now ...42000 btu is the heat loss number .It is a 1200 sq ft slab on grade 1.5 storey .Total living space is 1900 sq. feet .It is 2by 6 blown in fiberglass with 2.5 inches of EPS on the exterior .We do have lots of triple pane large high windows on the lake side which is a north east exposure ...,that one large combo living,kitchen,dining room is a 17000 btu heat load .I was hoping to heat it with a Fujitsu mini split on each level ...Is that still a viable option ? I am in Peterborough Ontario which is a zone 6 ...thanks,Bob

Asked By bob holodinsky | Jul 8 14
27 Answers

Does anyone out there have any experience with Ray-Core Walls?
http://www.raycore.com/

Apparently they are a SIP-like wall/roof panel with R-7.25 polyurethane foam.

Asked By Brett Moyer | Oct 11 10
2 Answers

I am retrofitting a 1920's era, balloon framed, south-half, east west semi in Toronto and am hoping somebody can weigh in on my approach. All my work is from the interior.

On the outside of the stud cavity there is plank sheathing ~1/2" x 8" with gaps and kraft paper. The west face is brick clad, and the south and east have aluminum siding with a minimal foam backing and shingles behind. I suspect, but am not certain, there is also brick behind that. I know builders can skimp on side and rear, but the same style neighboring houses are brick on all sides.

Asked By drew adams | Jul 11 14
1 Answer

We are in a 5A climate zone, near Chicago. We wanted to add a retractable pool enclosure up against an existing house that would be used year round. http://www.libart.com/evolution-lean-to-structures

The existing house has a wall construction what has fiber cement siding, 1" rigid insulation with taped seams, Tyvek, 5/8" plywood, 2x6 framing with open cell insulation and drywall on the interior. See attached image. Keep in mind that this wall was build 9 or so years ago.

Asked By Nathan Kipnis | Jul 11 14
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