Are There Some Products That Do Not Belong in Any Green House?

Absolutely.

Green houses are tighter than regular houses, so indoor air quality can be compromised by products and materials that off gas. Here are a few suggestions:

Paints and stains with high levels of VOCsVolatile organic compound. An organic compound that evaporates readily into the atmosphere; as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, VOCs are organic compounds that volatize and then become involved in photochemical smog production. (volatile organic compounds). Generally speaking, oil-based finishes have higher VOCVolatile organic compound. An organic compound that evaporates readily into the atmosphere; as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, VOCs are organic compounds that volatize and then become involved in photochemical smog production. levels than do water-based products.

Carpeting that that does not carry the Carpet and Rug Institute’s Green Label or Green Label Plus.

Exotic hardwoods (mahogany, teak and the like) that is not certified by the Forest Stewardship Council(FSC) Nonprofit organization that promotes forestry practices that are sustainable from environmental and social standpoints; FSC certification on a wood product is an indicator that the wood came from a well-managed forest. or a like organization.

Old-growth softwoods (Douglas fir, redwood and yellow cedar, for example) that have not been sustainably harvested.

Pressed wood products, such as particleboard, made with urea formaldehydeChemical found in many building products; most binders used for manufactured wood products are formaldehyde compounds. Reclassified by the United Nations International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in 2004 as a “known human carcinogen." adhesives.

Windows and doors that do not meet Energy StarLabeling system sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Energy for labeling the most energy-efficient products on the market; applies to a wide range of products, from computers and office equipment to refrigerators and air conditioners. guidelines.

VinylCommon term for polyvinyl chloride (PVC). In chemistry, vinyl refers to a carbon-and-hydrogen group (H2C=CH–) that attaches to another functional group, such as chlorine (vinyl chloride) or acetate (vinyl acetate). flooring.

Heating and cooling equipment with low energy-efficiency ratings.

At almost every turn, builders and homeowners have choices about the products and materials they buy. Look for durable, nonpolluting products and avoid those that have health, environmental and energy drawbacks.

More Info:

To learn more, see the GreenSpec Product Guide

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