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7 Answers

Air exchange / ventilation / dehumidifier options for a sealed, 640 s.f. structure

I am building a 640 s.f. structure and insulating i twith closed cell spray foam. Heat is provided by a fireplace with an outside air supply and baseboard heat.

I need an energy-efficient air conditioning / ventilation / dehmidifier / air exchange solution, mainly to keep it dry, but also to keep it cool.

It is located in a typical, four season climate where we get hot, humid summers and cold, snowy winters.

In Mechanicals | Asked By Nathan Hiscock | Feb 8 16
2 Answers

What happens when Tyvek goes uncovered too long?

I am a resident in a new apartment building in SC. I read the article on Tyvek and have reviewed that Tyvek has between 4-9 months to go uncovered before it expires. It has been 6 months, and the outside of our building is for the most part finished but has large areas of uncovered Tyvek. Recently my roommate and I noticed that at the bottom of our large windows we found large sums of puddled condensation and mold growing. Is this a result of the Tyvek being uncovered? We are not the only residents to have found this problem.

In Energy efficiency and durability | Asked By lindsey adams | Feb 9 16
5 Answers

Infrared panel heat: any reviews?

I am heating my zone 6 2300sf house with minisplits and a propane fireplace. The bathrooms, however are more isolated in the floor plan. I had been considering supplemental infloor electric radiant or kickspace heaters until I discovered ceiling- or wall-mounted infrared heating panels. The smallest 250w glass or steel units look like they easily heat 50sf rooms. Some are even available as a mirror. It looks like an efficient way to occasionally heat rooms that have air pulled into the HRV. Are there any good independent reviews out there on the concept?

In Mechanicals | Asked By Edward Mallett | Feb 8 16
33 Answers

Water heater decisions

In the process of building a new house and trying to decide on the best strategy for hot water heating.

We tried to be efficient with our floor plan design, and were able to clump the bathrooms and laundry room in one corner of the 2nd floor of our house. The guest bath is downstairs, almost directly underneath the baths upstairs. The only outlier is the kitchen and a half bath, which is on the other side of the house.

The house is all electric, and there are a couple of things I'm concerned about...

First

In Green building techniques | Asked By Clay Whitenack | Feb 1 16
3 Answers

I have a crawl space with cold joints that are inadequately sealed and ooze water. How can I seal them?

I would like to do it healthfully and effectively so I don't have to be concerned about water intrusion in the future.

In Green building techniques | Asked By Kevin Krafft | Feb 7 16
1 Answer

Perlite vs. rigid foam insulation

Hello have a question that will probably generate many opinions, i am building a new house zone 5 , was planing on using rigid foam under slab , but some one recommended that i use Perlite in bags instead , says
1) easier to work with
2) easier to pour slab over as you can level things out with sand
3) cost about the same or cheaper then ridged Foam
4) has better R value

In General questions | Asked By Boris Rubinstein | Feb 8 16
7 Answers

Will this exterior wall system work for my tiny house?

I live in South Dakota in zone 6a (Sioux Falls). In a few months time I will be constructing a tiny house on wheels using 18 gauge structural studs. Starting in the wall cavity will be sprayed closed cell foam. On the exterior sides of the studs (and any other exposed metal areas- the steel trailer) I plan on using strips of 1 inch thick xps rigid foam with a compressive strength of 60 lbs/square inch. Also I will use steel strapping all around the outside to give it some shear strength and prevent racking.

In Energy efficiency and durability | Asked By Damon Beck | Feb 7 16
9 Answers

Trying to warm up an uninsulated concrete garage floor

Kenora Ontario Canada P9N0E7
Climate zone 7

Background- I have a 24 x 30 ft garage with 2x6 wood framed walls (R20 fiberglass batts in stud bays) and a raised heel truss attic (8 ft walls) the ceiling has R50 blown fiberglass.
The man door is located on the south wall and the two 7x9 insulated overhead doors are on the north wall...the ridge of the 6/12 pitched roof runs E-W.
The concrete pad is a 4 inch thickened edge slab over 6 inches of compacted stone; the earth is well drained and slopes away rapidly in all directions.
I use 1/2 the building for parking and 1/2 for a shop.

In General questions | Asked By Tim Brown | Feb 7 16
3 Answers

What makes ceiling fan remotes break?

About 10 years ago, somebody at the Florida Solar Energy Center was involved with the design of the Windward III ceiling fan, which at the time was the most efficient fan money could buy. Due I think to the variable blade pitch. I installed a couple of them and now one of their remotes no longer functions. What causes this and is it repairable?

In Green products and materials | Asked By Charles Campbell | Feb 3 16
16 Answers

Geothermal and SDHV in new ICF home

We are in the process of building a new home in Climate Zone 5. It is an ICF [insulated concrete form] construction from basement foundation to gable.

I am intending to use a SDHV [small duct, high velocity] system for forced air and heating in conjunction with a closed loop ground source heat pump.

What I am trying to understand is the impact to efficiency caused by my desire for SDHV on the heat pump options side of life.

In Mechanicals | Asked By Esteban Carlos | Feb 4 16
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