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0 Answers

Basement Remodel/Subfloor questions

I have a few questions about my plan to insulate a subfloor in the basement.

Let me provided the pertinent details and my purposed plan.

The brick ranch house located in zone 4a (Virginia) was built in 1965. It has both an above and below grade basement. The structure is concrete block. The front long wall and one short wall are completely below grade. The back wall and half of the other side wall are above grade. The basement is conditioned.

In Energy efficiency and durability | Asked By Steve Basic | Feb 3 16
0 Answers

Thermoarcilla? Termoarcilla? Thermal Clay?

I've been working with a Spanish carpenter who told me that a lot of walls in Spain are being built with Thermal Clay, which I guess is the translation of Termoarcilla. I have had greast difficulty fining much information online in English (sorry my Spanish is not so good).

Here is some information: http://bloquetermoarcilla.es/en/productos-termoarcilla.php

In Green products and materials | Asked By E T | Feb 3 16
8 Answers

Roxul comfort board in basement?

I spoke to someone at the Roxul company the other day who recommended the following basement insulation. First, tyvek or similar against the concrete basement wall, then 1 1/4 " roxul comfort board for a thermal break, then a stud wall filled with roxul batts--- sheetrock. Do you see a real problem with water condensing on the concrete with the comfort board and tyvek there? Still seems like too much work but I am curious performance wise.

In Energy efficiency and durability | Asked By Nyle Phillips | Sep 27 12
31 Answers

Which Weather Resistive Barrier behind new masonry?

I'm coming up on a project involving cladding Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) with a full-thickness veneer natural stone wall. So, from the outside in, it will be stone - 1" gap - WRB - 6.5" SIP panel.

Question: Which WRB is preferable?
Context: I am in northwest Ohio.

The following page on this site's Product Guide lists a number of products, but links only to manufacturers' info: http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/product-guide/cat/water-resistive-ba...

In Green products and materials | Asked By Andy Chappell-Dick | Jun 11 13
0 Answers

Moisture accumulating before vapor barrier installed.

I'm in zone 7A and built an attached garage this fall: in slab heat, 2X6 walls, Rex wrap and OSB sheeting. The in floor heat got hooked up and turned on the beginning of January at the same time I began insulating the walls with unfaced fiberglass batts and faced batts in the ceiling.

Before I got poly vapor barrier up on the inside, there was a large amount of moisture (it was frost when it was cold outside) accumulating on the inside of the sheeting behind the batts.

In General questions | Asked By Neil Knutson | Feb 3 16
0 Answers

what makes ceiling fan remotes breaK?

About 10 years ago, somebody at the Florida Solar Energy Center was involved with the design of the Windward III ceiling fan, which at the time was the most efficient fan money could buy. Due I think to the variable blade pitch. I installed a couple of them and now one of their remotes no longer functions. What causes this and is it repairable?

In Green products and materials | Asked By charles CAMPBELL | Feb 3 16
10 Answers

Blower Door Results -- room for improvement?

Hi,

I had a blower door test performed as well as thermal imaging taken.

My home is 3300 sq ft of finished living space, 1600 sq ft of unconditioned basement and about 1200 sq feet of unconditioned attic (the remaining roof is cathedral ceiling).

My blower door test came back at 3050 cfm. The tech said that to get down to 2350 cfm would be "perfect" and that I was about 30% above optimal but that it, in his estimation, we were at the point of diminishing returns outside of caulking some areas we identified as leakage sites.

In Energy efficiency and durability | Asked By Justin Brown | Feb 2 16
3 Answers

open cell or closed cell

I have a pole barn that is covered in metal . It has a cement floor,insulated garage door,it will be a/c only ,an its in central fla. One contractor wants to use closed cell at 11/2''. Number 2 guy wants to do closed cell on roof an open cell on walls [2x6]. Number three guy wants to do the entire building in open cell. I,ve read alot of info on these products, I,ve talk to guys about it an I,m still unsure. I,m leaning towards the closed cell but iI,m not sure about the thickness of it. also the closed cell is the lowest price [still pricey] I,d your thoughts on this ..

In Energy efficiency and durability | Asked By bill metzger | Feb 2 16
12 Answers

New home HRV with massive shower/hot tub and range hood

I am building a new 3500 sq/foot home in New England. Well the 3500 does not count the finished basement of another 1000 nor does it over the "attic" space. The house is being framed now and we plan on spray forming the rafters. It has zip system on the exterior sheathing & taped. So the house will be tight.
Here is my issue... the house will have a "gourmet" kitchen which translates to a 48" range with a crazy 150,000 btu cook top. If you use the standard rule of thumb if 100cfm for 1kbtu.. that is a 1500 cfm externally mounted blower for the range hood.... yea..

In Energy efficiency and durability | Asked By Ken Leach | Jan 31 16
11 Answers

Fastening strapping for steel roof

For my simple gable roof, I will be installing exposed-fastener steel roofing atop 2x4 strapping atop Grace Tri-Flex underlayment atop OSB sheathing atop trusses 24" oc. Everything I've read indicates that screws would be best for fastening the strapping, as they offer far greater withdrawal resistance than nails, but I haven't found any recommendations on the best fastening pattern. Would using two 3-1/2" exterior deck screws at each intersection between the strapping (laid broad side down) and the truss top chords be best?

In General questions | Asked By Jeff Cooper | Feb 1 16
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