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2 Answers

Every since my father put in a new rooft and months later new windows we have been having problems with a leaky roof. About two years ago, one winter day we noticed that ceiling of our porch was dripping water it literally like it was sweating. Our porch floor would always be wet and slippery. Someone had mentioned to me that it may be condensation. I guess this happens when cold and hot air meet which causes the condensation. Can someone please give me some input?

Thnx......

In General questions | Asked By Maritza Gladstone | Jan 25 12
9 Answers

Beyond the big penetrations (like windows and doors and attic hatches), I'd like to hear / see how builders are dealing with the smaller penetrations in the envelope.

Using a can of spray foam is tempting, but I don't think it's necessarily the best choice.

How do you effectively seal these?

* Electrical meter base / service panel conduit

* Exterior receptacles

* Vent stacks

* HVAC line sets

* Ventilation hoods

* Hose bibbs

In Mechanicals | Asked By Daniel Ernst | Dec 5 11
22 Answers

My house is all electric except for a propane cooktop. I had a energy audit done last week. Although I don't have a proposal yet, closed cell insulation at the rim joists (fiberglass batts are there now), venting bathroom exhaust fans to the outside, and adding to the blown insulation in the ceiling (plus installing baffles) will probably be included. The attic area above the bedroom level of the house is not accessible now, so a hatch would need to be cut in a closet ceiling. My reading suggests this is a fairly typical approach.

In Energy efficiency and durability | Asked By Carol Oblas | Jan 25 12
9 Answers

In a truss framed cathedral ceiling with R-60 cellulose and continuous vent channels from soffit to ridge, how important is the permeability of the roof membrane with a charcoal colored asphalt shingle roof?

Location; Western Massachusetts - Climate Zone 5, 7928 HDD

In Energy efficiency and durability | Asked By Jon Wyman | Aug 6 10
1 Answer

Looking for 8 foot hood with a make-up air/heat exhaust fan
Any suggestions or recommendations?

Victor

In General questions | Asked By Bet Stepney | Jan 25 12
10 Answers

I’m working on the design of a two story house in Climate Zone 5 for a client with a somewhat limited budget. (I’m attaching a dwg showing the schematic section)
There are a number of different conditions in the house.
The main roof over the Second Floor will be a low slope EPDM roof pitched at ¼” per foot. The ceiling of the second floor is located at the bottom of the trusses.
There is a small portion of the house that is one story and covered by a shed roof with a metal standing seam roof that meets a higher wall.

In GBA Pro help | Asked By Linda Gatter | Jan 23 12
7 Answers

I am in the whole house fan business (http://www.invisco.com) and just released an R60 duct adapter. I notice that there is nothing like it for HVAC ducts. Are those ducts too small to be of concern? My design can be used to add insulation to ceiling connections to meet R38, R49 and even R60 for hvac ceiling interfaces if that would be of value.

In Energy efficiency and durability | Asked By Kurt Shafer | Jan 23 12
4 Answers

Hi all. I know the issue of insulation for cathedral ceilings has been addressed before, but I am still confused by what the best approach is for a vented cathedral. I live in Westchester, NY. We currently have 3 large skylights in our great room. One has developed a bad leak, so we have taken down much of the ceiling and are now considering the choice of fixing them or eliminating them. The beams are 2x10s, which currenly have about 10 inches of fiberglass batts. there is no vent channel against the roof, so I assume the air just moves through the fiberglas.

In Energy efficiency and durability | Asked By Richard Cohn | Jan 24 12
Answers

Credit where credit is due: the U.S Department of Energy's Building American program has done a great job with their new introduction to air sealing:
Air Sealing: A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners

Check it out -- it's good.

In Energy efficiency and durability | Asked By Martin Holladay | Jan 24 12
23 Answers

Keeping with the theme of the week-- not-so foamy homes-- I am trying to come up with a solution for insulating a rim joist area with open web floor trusses that does not include foam.

Has anyone tried to wet spray cellulose onto the rim joist between/around the floor trusses? I would imagine that wet sprayed cavities need to be incapsulated on all six sides to avoid settling, but I could wrong about this.

Dense packing the area with insulweb and cellulose would a nightmare-- it would be dang near impossible to fasten the insulweb around the webbing of the floor trusses.

In Energy efficiency and durability | Asked By Brett Moyer | Jan 13 11
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