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9 Answers

What is Ecorock.?Is it a wall board with a formaldehyde free glue or other non outgassing glue or binder? Where can I get information on this product?

In Green products and materials | Asked By Frank Austin | Apr 5 11
7 Answers

I know we've looked at this many times, this question addresses a specific point for clarification. Energy retrofits can be expensive. If we are going to make a difference in climate change we need to make retrofits more attractive to home-owners by making them more affordable.

In Energy efficiency and durability | Asked By David Ely | May 21 11
7 Answers

I can't remember which Q&A post or blog post gave a rule of thumb for foam thickness and below-grade depth equivalents--might have been here somewhere (below) but I'm not sure.

http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/musings/foam-under-footings

In General questions | Asked By Minneapolis Disaster | May 16 11
3 Answers

"Smart Plugs" have recently become affordable that are designed to shut off vampire plug loads.

As mentioned elsewhere, the digital cable box is an especially heinous phantom load of $60/yr.
http://www.masslive.com/news/index.ssf/2008/09/phantom_load_lurks_in_hom...

Well, I tried an iGo Green smart plug for my home TV & electronics center, and it doesn't work.
http://www.igo.com/other-power/power-smart-wall-with-igo-greenr-technolo...

In Green products and materials | Asked By Kevin Dickson, MSME | May 20 11
8 Answers

I am in the process of buying FSC hardwood floors for my home. I would like to have them finished outside of the home because of chemical sensitivity. The company I contacted uses a product called Opticure. When I look at the MSDS sheet I am horrified. I was told that once cured, these chemicals pose no hazard. I am wondering how that can be? I am guessing this is not an environmentally sound choice but I am running out of options. Is this something that should be avoided at all costs?

In Green products and materials | Asked By Arlene DiMarino | May 20 11
7 Answers

So we are rebuilding a bathroom here's some of the efficiences that are planned:

* Water sense shower & faucets
* Dual flush toilet (not water sense). We want it to be wall hung we have only found Toto Aquias
* Exhaust routed via ERV with humidistat trigger and timer
* A heat recovery drain for the shower
* Delta Touch 20 faucet to be able to touch control the water and hopefully waste less water especially hot water (and battery operated to avoid phantom loads).
* Two level CFL lighting

In Green building techniques | Asked By Mark Bartosik | May 18 11
0 Answers

Discussions here have usually and often lamented the resistance of bankers, real estate folk, appraisers and, ultimately, buyers to be willing to pay "extra" for energy improvements. Here's a blog entry from a consumer advocate I follow -- Clark Howard is also on HLN on the weekends so you may have run into him there.

http://www.clarkhoward.com/news/clark-howard/homes-real-estate/whole-hou...

Interesting I think, and encouraging.

Joe

In General questions | Asked By JoeW N GA Zone 3A | May 19 11
7 Answers

We are planning to insulate at the roof for a shed portion of our home. We are planning on using densepak cellulose in the 2x12 rafter bays with a ventilation chute at the top. We would like to also add 2" of rigid at the underside of the rafters to reduce thermal bridging and bring the R-value up for the assembly. I believe that I have heard the technique of using rigid insulation to create the ventilation chute at the top of the rafter bays, which would help us as we try and reach an R-49 for this assembly; But is it a mistake to have the rigid on both sides of the cellulose?...

In Energy efficiency and durability | Asked By heidi davis | May 18 11
3 Answers

I have insulated my basement walls here in Detroit with 2" XPS. We have fastened 1x3 furring strips over the XPS using Tapcon screws. I am wondering if there would be any problem with compressing 3.5" unfaced fiberglass batts in the space between the furring strips. 1/2" drywall will go over the furring strips.

In Energy efficiency and durability | Asked By Gregory Worrel | May 19 11
5 Answers

We are planning a little luxary in our bathroom of about 25 sq ft of electrically powered radiant floor (power is from solar). We want to be able to switch on the floor heat ,go into the shower, and when we come out the floor would be if not warm, at least tepid. So it only has 10 to 15 minutes to heat up.

We don't want to leave it on for long periods -- too wasteful.
We don't want to have the floor heat on a timer so it comes on 30 minutes before we want to use it - not practical.

Thus I think that it is important to have a low thermal mass under the heating elements.

In Green building techniques | Asked By Mark Bartosik | May 18 11
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