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Pretty Good House in a Hot-Humid Climate

Russell Bounds | Posted in Energy Efficiency and Durability on

With the goals of :
long term low maintenance
efficient energy usage
managing cost vs best practices :

I have read a good bit of the information provided here and on other sites. As most of the information is directed towards the more northern locations – I’m struggling with what to do in my situation – Lower mid TN.
Currently I’m thinking 2×4 walls, fiberglass at R15, 1/2 -3/4 foam on outside, WRB then a good composite siding –
Will be a W/O, mostly facing N/S, lower level  – 3 sided Superior Walls, with the one north facing to the lake  – all stick built.
Most of main level is open concept – about 1400 ftsq, with a dreaded cathedral ceiling in the great room/kitchen area. I have an idea as to how to vent it, and get r-40 or so.
Windows – the longest lead time – probably double pane, low  E-2 but I cannot figure out which manufacturer – Marvin – Pella are leading mostly due to local suppliers.
Will have ERV with good ventilation system – not decided on the HVAC .
I am the builder/GC.  As well as the primary laborer. A few subs involved – framing, foundation, roofing – …
Any ideas or comment welcome.
thanks

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Replies

  1. Walter Ahlgrim | | #1

    If your choices are about getting the best return on your investment in windows and insulation choices consider building a BEopt computer model of your home with your local weather fuel costs and interest rate will let you compare all the options with costs you enter for each option. The program draws a graph on the top left is the option that cost the least to build in the top right is the building that cost the least to operate at the bottom is the sweet spot that cost the least to build and operate.

    Be sure to find and watch the training videos on YouTube.

    https://www.nrel.gov/buildings/beopt.html

    Walta

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