GBA Logo horizontal Facebook LinkedIn Email Pinterest Twitter Instagram YouTube Icon Navigation Search Icon Main Search Icon Video Play Icon Plus Icon Minus Icon Picture icon Hamburger Icon Close Icon Sorted

Community and Q&A

HRV system design

Dave B | Posted in Mechanicals on

Hi
Building a new home located in Osaca, Ontario (East of Toronto) just in early design stage. Single storey with full conditioned walk-out basement (2200 sq’ per floor). Truss attic with blown cellulose insulation. Hoping to build pretty good or if possible Net-Zero home. Looking at HRV or ERV design for the home, I have a couple questions.

1. The Kitchen and living area are open to each other both roughly same size (15×18). I assume its fine to have the fresh air at one end and the exhaust (kitchen area) at the other? No problems being in the “same room “.

2. Is it fine to have the vents fresh or exhaust on the walls and not in the ceiling? If they have to be in ceiling, they would be in the un-condition attic space covered in cellulose. Hopefully 24”

I have read many articles but may have missed one answering my questions.

Thanks
Dave

GBA Prime

Join the leading community of building science experts

Become a GBA Prime member and get instant access to the latest developments in green building, research, and reports from the field.

Replies

  1. GBA Editor
    Martin Holladay | | #1

    Dave,
    Q. "The kitchen and living area are open to each other, and both are roughly same size (15'x18'). I assume it's fine to have the fresh air at one end and the exhaust (kitchen area) at the other?"

    A. Yes, that's fine -- as long as the exhaust grille is as far as possible from the kitchen range. Under no circumstances should a range hood be connected to an HRV exhaust duct. You don't want your exhaust grille to inadvertently suck in a lot of cooking grease or smoke.

    Q. "Is it fine to have the vents for fresh or exhaust air on the walls and not in the ceiling?"

    A. Yes. High up on the walls is better than low down on the walls.

    Q. "If they have to be in ceiling, they would be in the unconditioned attic space covered in cellulose."

    A. It's possible to route ventilation ducts in an unconditioned attic as you propose, as long as the ducts are buried in deep cellulose. But keeping the ducts inside the home's conditioned space is even better.

    For more information on HRV ducting, including tips on locating registers and grilles on walls, see this article: Installing a Heat-Recovery Ventilator.

    -- Martin Holladay

  2. Dave B | | #2

    Thanks Martin for the quick reply and article, I missed that one.
    As for distance from the range, is there numbers for this?
    It will an induction stove with hood above, which will be the next problem to solve ( make -up air)
    I BBQ a lot so there shouldn't be a lot of greasy meals cooked inside.

  3. GBA Editor
    Martin Holladay | | #3

    Dave,
    Q. "As for distance from the range: are there numbers for this?"

    A. I would use common sense. How does a minimum horizontal distance of 6 feet sound to you?

    -- Martin Holladay

Log in or create an account to post an answer.

Community

Recent Questions and Replies

  • |
  • |
  • |
  • |