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Mechanical Consultant (Heat pump, HRV, Electric Hot Water)

Richard_R | Posted in Mechanicals on

Can anyone recommend an independent mechanical systems consultant who could help me with decisions about HRVs, heat pumps, and electric hot water heaters for a 1500sf retrofit? I’m in the Seattle area, but I don’t suppose the consultant would need to be.

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Replies

  1. Mark Nagel | | #1

    Curious as to why you're fixing on an HRV rather than an ERV. Perhaps you were/are using "HRV" as a generic term?

    I'm north of you a bit and I've identified a need for an ERV. We have relatively low humidity during the winter seasons and higher humidity in the summer seasons. My understanding is that an ERV is better suited for such. Maybe others can correct my understanding?

    I'm guessing that if you're contemplating an HRV/ERV it's because you're tightening up your house?

    Water heater sizing really depend on one's expected use/load (just like space heating/cooling loads). This is one area that's pretty easy to figure: what one decides to use for meeting the requirements, however, can be a can of worms (and I'm going to stay out of any discussions on such).

  2. Richard_R | | #2

    I thought the PNW was HRV territory, but I'm open to correction.

  3. Mark Nagel | | #3

    I was pretty sure HRV as well, but I changed my mind after reading a lot of comments here, on this site.

    Here's a fairly good overview of what goes into the decision:

    https://www.zehnderamerica.com/hrv-versus-erv-how-do-i-choose/

    Because I changed my mind once I figure that it's changeable, again; just haven't run across anything, yet, that would flip it back again. I'm not faced with an immediate need to finalize my selection as I'm still in early planning (new build).

  4. Mark Nagel | | #4

    I'll add that I have kept watch on humidity levels and temps for many years: I have a weather station; I was once in meteorology, so kind of a buff. I can confirm that problematic humidity levels are during summer months (physics also supports this- warmer air can contain more water vapor). During winter the humidity levels are lower; mine get even lower because of a woodstove.

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