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Community and Q&A

Thermatlantic. DX2W module

rhl_ | Posted in Mechanicals on

Has anyone had any experience with these modules in the USA ? 

http://thermatlantic.com/air-to-water-heat-pumps/

If so what outdoor unit did you use? 

I’ll be calling tomorrow to see if they support the Mitsubishi outdoor units. If so, it seems suitable for many retrofit applications. 

In particular, this would support the use of water for servicing indoor units, which solves often discussing comfort issues with existing and popular minisplits. 

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Replies

  1. GBA Editor
    Brian Pontolilo | | #1

    Hey Ryan.

    I can't help with this, but I'm giving your post a bump to see if it catches the attention of any of our more mechanically-knowledgeable members.

  2. PittsboroNC | | #2

    Yes, we have this system.

  3. rhl_ | | #3

    I had since followed up, it doesn't work with traditional DX air source systems due to the controls.

    I'm curious how people like this system.

    It's a cool idea, if it supported the proprietary controls we would be all set.

  4. charlie_sullivan | | #4

    I'm a fan of hydronic heat pumps, but I'm not convinced this is a good way to go. The downside of hydronics is the one-off engineering of each installation, which isn't all that hard, but there are few people who are actually qualified to do it. A packaged system like Chiltrix has more of the engineering done ahead of time, and even then, there are frequently challenges--it can work very well when done right but there are many ways to do it wrong.

    In addition, one of the advantages of a packaged system is that there is less refrigerant needed and there are no refrigerant lines connected on site, so there are fewer opportunities to leak high GWP gasses, and if the worst case of a severe leak, there is less there to leak.

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